The goals and objectives of the Career Development Program (CDP) are to provide training and guidance for academic physician-scientists, clinician-investigators, and laboratory-based scientists who want to dedicate their endeavors to leukemia translational research. To achieve these aims, the CDP will follow these objectives: 1. Recruit and train physician, scientists, and senior postdoctoral fellows to become outstanding translational investigators in leukemia research; 2. Mentor awardees in the latest advances in cancer biology, at both the molecular and cellular level, emphasizing the translational aspects of research; 3. Provide environmental and institutional resources that enable the awardees to excel in their respective fields of research as well as train them to be resourceful in the area of project development and scientific discovery; 4. Foster professional growth in the area of translational research by encouraging awardees1 participation in seminars, presentations, conferences both within their parent institution and outside in the scientific community. Lay Description: The goals and objectives of the Career Development Program (CDP) are to provide training and guidance for academic physician-scientists, clinician-investigators, and laboratory-based scientists who want to dedicate their endeavors to leukemia translational research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA100632-10
Application #
8378219
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-M)
Project Start
Project End
2013-08-31
Budget Start
2012-06-20
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$74,475
Indirect Cost
$52,005
Name
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
800772139
City
Houston
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
77030
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