The Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core facility provides the statistical and computational support for all GI cancer SPORE investigators. The Core will support consultation and collaboration on all aspects of study design, database development and quality control, and analysis and interpretation of data. The statisticians and bioinformatics scientists participating in the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core have been chosen for their broad range of expertise and experience in clinical trials, laboratory experiments, genetics and genomics research, computational biology and epidemiology studies. Dr. Dianne Finkelstein and Dr. Hui Zheng have extensive experience as statisticians within the comprehensive cancer center and cooperative oncology group settings. Dr. John Quackenbush directs the Center for Cancer Computational Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and has extensive experience in genomics and computational biology. Dr. Barbara Weir and Nicholas Stransky are computational biologists who have deep expertise in the development and deployment of methods to analyze and integrate genomic datasets. Collectively these individuals have affiliations at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), DFCI, Harvard Medical School (HMS), Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. However, their SPORE collaborations will be based on areas of expertise and need and will involve investigators from several of the affiliate institutions. The Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core members have participated regularly in the planning meetings where the scientific goals and research methods of the SPORE projects were discussed.
The specific aims of this core facility are to;1: Provide ready access to statistical and bioinformatics expertise and computing consultation to the GI cancer SPORE program;2: Provide biostatistical/bioinformatics expertise for the planning, analysis and reporting of laboratory experiments, epidemiology studies and clinical trials;3: Advise and support SPORE investigators and their data collectors (technicians, nurses, data managers, etc.) in the areas of data form design, data collection, record abstraction, computerization, database designing and management, and data quality control;4: Provide support for the development of integrative computational models to facilitate the analysis and interpretation of complex genomic datasets;5: Provide the scientific computing expertise required to meet the data management and analytical needs of GI cancer SPORE investigators.

Public Health Relevance

During the last 20 years, the development of new statistical methodology for cancer research has resulted in an expanded role for the statistician in the research process and a higher standard for scientific evidence in a study. The Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core facility provides the statistical and computational support for all GI cancer SPORE investigators. The Core will support consultation and collaboration on all aspects of study design, database development and quality control, and analysis and interpretation of data.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
2P50CA127003-06A1
Application #
8485729
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-M (J1))
Project Start
2007-04-01
Project End
2018-06-30
Budget Start
2013-09-23
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
6
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$209,276
Indirect Cost
$33,085
Name
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Department
Type
DUNS #
076580745
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02215
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