All projects in this SPORE will use human specimens for translational research directed at reducing the incidence and mortality of pancreatic cancer. In order to provide the necessary specimens, a Pancreas Tumor SPORE Tissue Bank has been developed in cooperation with and under the auspices of the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) Tumor Bank. There are two components to this resource. The first component is a conventional tissue bank, which captures and stores all excess surgical material from patients seen at UNMC and affiliated institutions, related to pancreatic and Gl malignancies. This tissue bank also captures and stores samples related to clinical trials that are ongoing as part of SPORE activites. The second component is an organ harvest/rapid autopsy program in which patients who die with pancreatic cancer donate their organs for research purposes. This program captures and processes entire internal organs from these patients, including all available samples of primary tumor and metastases.The guidelines and protocols for collecting specimens established by the UNMC Tumor Bank and the Institutional Review Board are followed for the SPORE proposal. This core facility stores normal, benign (i.e. acute and/or chronic fibrosing pancreatitis) and malignant pancreatic tissues (including both primary and metastatic pancreatic carcinomas) and peripheral blood lymphocytes, plasma and serum from patients with pancreatic malignancies. The Bank also coordinates collection and storage of pancreatic ductal secretions and peritoneal washings. Cytogenetic analysis is performed on malignant lesions when possible. The core includes a mechanism for database management and specimen distribution. A uniform system of prioritization of requested materials has been defined and used by the Pancreas Tumor SPORE Tissue Bank Oversight Committee. This core facility is intended to benefit the specific research activities of the SPORE, as well as the research activities of other scientists within and outside of UNMC who are concentrating on translational research issues. Additionally, tissues are available for distribution through NCI supported tissue networks in national prioritization. Only specimens obtained from clinically indicated surgeries after all other diagnostic procedures have been performed are submitted to the Pancreas Tumor SPORE Tissue Bank for translational research. The specimens would otherwise be discarded or disposed of. Eligible patients have the opportunity to participate by submitting written informed consent. There is no risk to the patient or compromise to the patient's care, since all of the procedures performed would be performed for diagnostic reasons regardless of the SPORE. Members of the pathology department and the clinical departments are participants in the individual research projects and thus, also contribute to the Core for maximal and effective accumulation of satisfactory specimens.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA127297-05
Application #
8381886
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-GRB-I)
Project Start
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2013-08-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$92,197
Indirect Cost
$34,395
Name
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
168559177
City
Omaha
State
NE
Country
United States
Zip Code
68198
Attri, Kuldeep S; Murthy, Divya; Singh, Pankaj K (2017) Racial disparity in metabolic regulation of cancer. Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) 22:1221-1246
Wu, Guangyin; Verma, Vivek; Haefner, Matthias F et al. (2017) Feasibility and reproducibility of substituting oral contrast with water for duodenal volume delineation in patients undergoing pancreatic stereotactic body radiotherapy. J Gastrointest Oncol 8:705-709
Verma, Vivek; Lazenby, Audrey J; Zheng, Dandan et al. (2017) Dosimetric parameters correlate with duodenal histopathologic damage after stereotactic body radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer: Secondary analysis of a prospective clinical trial. Radiother Oncol 122:464-469
Karmakar, Saswati; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban et al. (2017) hPaf1/PD2 interacts with OCT3/4 to promote self-renewal of ovarian cancer stem cells. Oncotarget 8:14806-14820
Shukla, Surendra K; Purohit, Vinee; Mehla, Kamiya et al. (2017) MUC1 and HIF-1alpha Signaling Crosstalk Induces Anabolic Glucose Metabolism to Impart Gemcitabine Resistance to Pancreatic Cancer. Cancer Cell 32:71-87.e7
King, Ryan J; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K (2017) Genomic alterations in mucins across cancers. Oncotarget :
Krishn, Shiv Ram; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Sheinin, Yuri M et al. (2017) Mucins and associated O-glycans based immunoprofile for stratification of colorectal polyps: clinical implication for improved colon surveillance. Oncotarget 8:7025-7038
Gautam, Shailendra K; Kumar, Sushil; Cannon, Andrew et al. (2017) MUC4 mucin- a therapeutic target for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Expert Opin Ther Targets 21:657-669
Abrego, Jaime; Gunda, Venugopal; Vernucci, Enza et al. (2017) GOT1-mediated anaplerotic glutamine metabolism regulates chronic acidosis stress in pancreatic cancer cells. Cancer Lett 400:37-46
Souchek, Joshua J; Davis, Amanda L; Hill, Tanner K et al. (2017) Combination Treatment with Orlistat-Containing Nanoparticles and Taxanes Is Synergistic and Enhances Microtubule Stability in Taxane-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells. Mol Cancer Ther 16:1819-1830

Showing the most recent 10 out of 163 publications