All projects in this SPORE will use human specimens for translational research directed at reducing the incidence and mortality of pancreatic cancer. In order to provide the necessary specimens, a Pancreas Tumor SPORE Tissue Bank has been developed in cooperation with and under the auspices of the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) Tumor Bank. The guidelines and protocols for collecting specimens established by the UNMC Tumor Bank and the Institutional Review Board are followed for the SPORE proposal. This core facility stores normal, benign (i.e. acute and/or chronic fibrosing pancreatitis) and malignant pancreatic tissues (including both primary and metastatic pancreatic carcinomas) and peripheral blood lymphocytes, plasma and serum from patients undergoing surgical procedures for pancreatic malignancies and from deceased patients with history of pancreatic cancer (rapid autopsy). The Bank also coordinates collection and storage of cytopathologic brushing or aspiration specimens of pancreatic ductal or pancreatic mass lesions. Cytogenetic analysis with storage of short-term cultured cells is performed on malignant lesions when possible. The core includes a mechanism for database management and specimen distribution. A uniform system of prioritization of requested materials has been defined and used by the Pancreas Tumor SPORE Tissue Bank Oversight Committee. This core facility is intended to benefit the specific research activities of the SPORE, as well as the research activities of other scientists within and outside of UNMC who are concentrating on translational research issues. Additionally, tissues are available for distribution through NCI supported tissue networks in national prioritization. Only specimens obtained from clinically indicated surgeries after all other diagnostic procedures have been performed are submitted to the Pancreas Tumor SPORE Tissue Bank for translational research. The specimens would otherwise be discarded or disposed of. Eligible patients have the opportunity to participate by submitting written informed consent. There is no risk to the patient or compromise to the patient's care, since all of the procedures performed would be performed for diagnostic reasons regardless of the SPORE.

Public Health Relevance

Establishing a banking or collection approach of cancerous and non-cancerous pancreatic tissue, in addition to blood samples, from patients undergoing surgical procedures for pancreatic disease or from deceased patients that have had a history of pancreatic cancer per an autopsy procedure is vital for carrying out research to study the process of pancreatic cancer. Researchers will study the cell properties of these diseased tissues in the bank to better understand pancreatic cancer.

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