Translational research in gastrointestinal cancer is critically needed to enhance applications of the knowledge gained through the rapid expansion of our understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cancer. A comprehensive faculty career development program is proposed to meet the urgent need for increased number of clinicians and basic scientists devoted to gastrointestinal cancer research. Although some of this need has been addressed through NIH T32 training grants for post doctoral fellows, transition to an independent, funded research career in gastrointestinal cancer for full time faculty has been difficult. Direct funding of young investigators with outstanding new translational research programs relevant to gastrointestinal cancer is proposed to address this limitation. Focus on young faculty members will ensure attraction of new, energetic investigators, who when successful, will likely maintain a long-tenn research interest in gastrointestinal oncology. A rigorous selection process is outlined that includes University-wide recruitment, strong emphasis on recruitment of women and minorities and comprehensive basic and clinical science mentoring. Close evaluation and monitoring is achieved through monthly meetings and annual internal and external review for continued funding. In addition to tailored scientific mentorship of individual projects, the Gl SPORE career development program establishes an educational process for young investigators that is closely integrated with existing programs within the Cancer Center, Medical School, and the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research. A major emphasis is placed on salary support for clinician scientists to ensure adequate time commitment to their SPORE research program.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Specialized Center (P50)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-GRB-I)
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University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
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