translational research that will meaningfully reduce the burden of ovarian cancer. A critical part of this process is to increase the quality and depth of the translational investigator base in ovarian cancer. The Career Development Program is based on the conviction that translational research can effectively proceed from the bench/population to the clinic or from the clinic to the bench/population. The ultimate objectives of the Career Development Program of the Ovarian SPORE are to identify and mentor new and developing investigators in ovarian cancer who demonstrate the clear potential to become independent translational researchers as well as attracting established scientists who wish to refocus on ovarian cancer. This will be accomplished through a rigorous review process aimed at identifying the most talented and promising candidate followed by intense effective mentoring, integration into ongoing SPORE activities and close oversight of the individual's progress. In addition to a primary mentor, awardees will have complementary mentors in clinical, basic or population sciences necessary to ensure development of a translational research career. This capitalizes on numerous strengths present within the Mayo environment. The Career Development Program will maintain close oversight over the mentoring activities and progress of the awardee. In turn, the Program will report to the Executive Committee of the Mayo Clinic Ovarian Cancer SPORE.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA136393-05
Application #
8547775
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-M)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$74,332
Indirect Cost
$27,582
Name
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Department
Type
DUNS #
006471700
City
Rochester
State
MN
Country
United States
Zip Code
55905
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Liu, Yu-Ping; Wang, Jiahu; Avanzato, Victoria A et al. (2014) Oncolytic vaccinia virotherapy for endometrial cancer. Gynecol Oncol 132:722-9
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Scott, Clare L; Mackay, Helen J; Haluska Jr, Paul (2014) Patient-derived xenograft models in gynecologic malignancies. Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book :e258-66
Charbonneau, Bridget; Moysich, Kirsten B; Kalli, Kimberly R et al. (2014) Large-scale evaluation of common variation in regulatory T cell-related genes and ovarian cancer outcome. Cancer Immunol Res 2:332-40
Brewer, LaPrincess C; Hayes, Sharonne N; Parker, Monica W et al. (2014) African American women's perceptions and attitudes regarding participation in medical research: the Mayo Clinic/The Links, Incorporated partnership. J Womens Health (Larchmt) 23:681-7
King, Helen; Aleksic, Tamara; Haluska, Paul et al. (2014) Can we unlock the potential of IGF-1R inhibition in cancer therapy? Cancer Treat Rev 40:1096-105

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