The Career Development Program (CDP) is an important component of this Leukemia SPORE application and the national SPORE program because it will assure a cadre of academic faculty who are translational scientists dedicated to discover and apply new approaches to understanding the etiology and epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of patients with leukemia. The goal of our CDP is to recruit, provide training and guidance {i.e. mentor and develop) and retain academic faculty level physicianscientists, clinician-investigators, and laboratory-based scientists who will dedicate their endeavors to leukemia translational research. Our focus will be primarily on recruitment of assistant professors. We will place special emphasis on recruiting qualified women and minorities. Indeed, all three of the candidates chosen for the first year positions are women and one is a minority. While any area of translational leukemia research will be considered, we will place special emphasis in our areas of strength which include human cancer genetics, animal models and preclinical and clinical experimental therapeutics. The goal will be to fund three positions at $100,000 each for one to three years. Applications will be solicited from all departments and centers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC) and by the SPORE Administrative Core. They will be screened for eligibility and diversity by the CDP Leader before formal review begins to assure that the pool contains qualified women and minorities. Applications will be judged based on the potential of the candidate, the strength of the proposed research and the appropriateness of the mentors. Applications will be formally reviewed, scored and ranked by members of the SPORE CDP Steering Committee. Final selection will be made by the CDP Leader and SPORE Program Director in consultation with the SPORE Executive Committee. Each position will be funded for one year, with eligibility for a second and third year dependent upon satisfactory annual progress following evaluation by the awardee's co-mentors and the SPORE Executive Committee. The SPORE will provide $150,000 annual funding to the program;$150,000 annually in matching funds will be provided from the OSUCCC. Success of the program will be judged by the quality, of the science generated by the awardees, their success in obtaining external peer reviewed funding, their success in academic advancement and their retention in academia and leukemia translational research.

Public Health Relevance

The Career Development Program (CDP) is an important component of this Leukemia SPORE application and the national SPORE program because it will assure a cadre of academic faculty who are specially trained translational scientists and clinicians dedicated to discover and apply new approaches to understanding the etiology and epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of patients with leukemia. This program helps to assure the continuity of professionals focused on leukemia diseases.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA140158-05
Application #
8521139
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-GRB-I)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$141,367
Indirect Cost
$59,735
Name
Ohio State University
Department
Type
DUNS #
832127323
City
Columbus
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
43210
Walker, C J; Eisfeld, A-K; Genutis, L K et al. (2017) No evidence for microsatellite instability in acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemia 31:1474-1476
Sekeres, Mikkael A; Othus, Megan; List, Alan F et al. (2017) Randomized Phase II Study of Azacitidine Alone or in Combination With Lenalidomide or With Vorinostat in Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia: North American Intergroup Study SWOG S1117. J Clin Oncol 35:2745-2753
Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof et al. (2017) Mutational Landscape and Gene Expression Patterns in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemias with Monosomy 7 as a Sole Abnormality. Cancer Res 77:207-218
Park, I-K; Blum, W; Baker, S D et al. (2017) E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b activates the p53 pathway by targeting Siva1, a negative regulator of ARF, in FLT3 inhibitor-resistant acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemia 31:502-505
Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Shen, Changxian; Nicolet, Deedra et al. (2017) Prognostic and biological significance of the proangiogenic factor EGFL7 in acute myeloid leukemia. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 114:E4641-E4647
Eisfeld, A-K; Kohlschmidt, J; Schwind, S et al. (2017) Mutations in the CCND1 and CCND2 genes are frequent events in adult patients with t(8;21)(q22;q22) acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemia 31:1278-1285
Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Nicolet, Deedra; Volinia, Stefano et al. (2017) Prognostic and biologic significance of long non-coding RNA profiling in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Haematologica 102:1391-1400
Wiczer, Tracy E; Levine, Lauren B; Brumbaugh, Jessica et al. (2017) Cumulative incidence, risk factors, and management of atrial fibrillation in patients receiving ibrutinib. Blood Adv 1:1739-1748
Miller, Cecelia R; Ruppert, Amy S; Heerema, Nyla A et al. (2017) Near-tetraploidy is associated with Richter transformation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients receiving ibrutinib. Blood Adv 1:1584-1588
Mani, R; Yan, R; Mo, X et al. (2017) Non-immunosuppressive FTY720-derivative OSU-2S mediates reactive oxygen species-mediated cytotoxicity in canine B-cell lymphoma. Vet Comp Oncol 15:1115-1118

Showing the most recent 10 out of 223 publications