The research proposed by the University of Texas SPORE in Prostate Cancer encompasses a broad range of activities, including studies in cell lines, animal models, and clinical trials. These studies will generate many different types of data, including clinical, epidemiological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical, pharmacokinetics, genotype and immunologic data. The Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core provides comprehensive biostatistics and bioinformatics expertise to ensure the statistical integrity and to optimize data analysis of the studies by the SPORE. It will incorporate sound experimental design principles within each project that will enhance interpretability of study results, will carry out data analyses using appropriate statistical methodology, and will contribute to interpretation of results through written reports and frequent interaction with project investigators. Members of the Core participate in monthly SPORE meeting with all project investigators, ensuring that proper consideration is taken of biostatistics and data management issues during all phases of SPORE experiments. The Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core will further provide an integrated data management system to facilitate communication among all projects and cores, which will be customized to meet the needs of the Prostate SPORE. This process includes prospective data collection, data quality control, data security, and patient confidentiality. Thus, from inception to reporting, translational experiments will benefit from SPORE resources that will be used to augment existing M.D. Anderson Cancer Center biostatistics resources.
The specific aims of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core are:
Aim 1. To provide valid statistical designs of laboratory research, clinical trials and translational experiments arising from the ongoing research of the SPORE.
Aim 2. To develop and conduct the innovative statistical modeling, simulations, and data analyses needed by the Projects, Developmental Projects, and other Cores to achieve their specific aims.
Aim 3. To ensure that the results of all Projects are based on well-designed experiments, appropriately interpreted, and to assist in the preparation of manuscripts describing these results.
Aim 4. To develop integrated computational libraries and tools for producing documented, reproducible statistical analyses, and to make these tools available to all SPORE participants.

Public Health Relevance

Core B personnel will collaborate with every one of the five proposed projects, will interact with the other cores and also will expect to interact with all funded development awards, and thus this core is crucially important to the SPORE. Areas where biostatistical and bioinformatics expertise are indispensable are in clinical trial, experimental design, and data analysis with integrated multi-platform data. It will be apparent from this proposal that Core personnel play a significant role in designing the proposed experiments/trials and in planning the data analysis in conjunction with an integrated data management system.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA140388-05
Application #
8541604
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-7)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$225,810
Indirect Cost
$76,040
Name
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
800772139
City
Houston
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
77030
Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan et al. (2016) CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment. Nat Commun 7:11674
Sun, Sheng; Sun, Le; Zhou, Xi et al. (2016) Phosphorylation-Dependent Activation of the ESCRT Function of ALIX in Cytokinetic Abscission and Retroviral Budding. Dev Cell 36:331-43
Hosoya, Hitomi; Dobroff, Andrey S; Driessen, Wouter H P et al. (2016) Integrated nanotechnology platform for tumor-targeted multimodal imaging and therapeutic cargo release. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113:1877-82
Maity, Sankar N; Titus, Mark A; Gyftaki, Revekka et al. (2016) Targeting of CYP17A1 Lyase by VT-464 Inhibits Adrenal and Intratumoral Androgen Biosynthesis and Tumor Growth of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer. Sci Rep 6:35354
Saha, Achinto; Blando, Jorge; Fernandez, Irina et al. (2016) Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo. Oncotarget 7:25194-207
Han, Ying; Rand, Kristin A; Hazelett, Dennis J et al. (2016) Prostate Cancer Susceptibility in Men of African Ancestry at 8q24. J Natl Cancer Inst 108:
Varkaris, Andreas; Corn, Paul G; Parikh, Nila U et al. (2016) Integrating Murine and Clinical Trials with Cabozantinib to Understand Roles of MET and VEGFR2 as Targets for Growth Inhibition of Prostate Cancer. Clin Cancer Res 22:107-21
Fong, Eliza L S; Wan, Xinhai; Yang, Jun et al. (2016) A 3D in vitro model of patient-derived prostate cancer xenograft for controlled interrogation of in vivo tumor-stromal interactions. Biomaterials 77:164-72
Weiderhold, Kimberly N; Fadri-Moskwik, Maria; Pan, Jing et al. (2016) Dynamic Phosphorylation of NudC by Aurora B in Cytokinesis. PLoS One 11:e0153455
Qiao, Yuanyuan; Feng, Felix Y; Wang, Yugang et al. (2016) Mechanistic Support for Combined MET and AR Blockade in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer. Neoplasia 18:1-9

Showing the most recent 10 out of 167 publications