The theme of the Pacific Northwest Center for Human Health and Ocean Sciences is elucidation of the mechanisms that govern relationships between marine processes and public health consequences of harmful algal blooms. Consistent with RFA ES-03-003, the investigators have designed a multidisciplinary research team including faculty from several academic institutions and departments in partnership with state and federal governmental organizations to facilitate both mechanistic and applied research on production and adverse affects of harmful algal blooms. The proposed Center will be a joint collaboration effort between two top-rated academic programs, the University of Washington Schools of Oceanography, Marine Affairs, and Aquatic and Fishery Science within the College of Ocean and Fishery Science and the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS) in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine. Also participating, both financially and with shared expertise, are investigators from the National Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington State Department of Health, Washington State Department of Ecology, the Institute for Systems Biology, and the University of Maryland. The premise underlying this research is that genetic and environmental variability defines the toxicity and dynamics of harmful algal blooms (HABs), the retention of the toxin by shellfish and the human populations that are susceptible to toxicological impacts. The theme of this Center emphasizes the importance of understanding and characterizing environmental conditions and forces that determine the development of HABs and the factors that determine human susceptibility to risk associated with exposure to these. This is responsive to the directives in the NSF and NIEHS sponsored roundtable on Oceans and Human Health.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50ES012762-05
Application #
7360298
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-LKB-E (OC))
Program Officer
Tyson, Frederick L
Project Start
2004-02-16
Project End
2010-12-31
Budget Start
2008-01-01
Budget End
2010-12-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2008
Total Cost
$467,050
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Washington
Department
Public Health & Prev Medicine
Type
Schools of Public Health
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
Port, Jesse A; Cullen, Alison C; Wallace, James C et al. (2014) Metagenomic frameworks for monitoring antibiotic resistance in aquatic environments. Environ Health Perspect 122:222-8
Giordano, Gennaro; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Faustman, Elaine M et al. (2013) Low-level domoic acid protects mouse cerebellar granule neurons from acute neurotoxicity: role of glutathione. Toxicol Sci 132:399-408
Port, Jesse A; Parker, Micaela S; Kodner, Robin B et al. (2013) Identification of G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway proteins in marine diatoms using comparative genomics. BMC Genomics 14:503
Marshall, Katharine T; Morris, Robert M (2013) Isolation of an aerobic sulfur oxidizer from the SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade. ISME J 7:452-5
Bender, Sara J; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia (2012) Coupled effects of light and nitrogen source on the urea cycle and nitrogen metabolism over a diel cycle in the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Protist 163:232-51
Yu, Xiaozhong; Sidhu, Jaspreet S; Hong, Sungwoo et al. (2011) Cadmium induced p53-dependent activation of stress signaling, accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and apoptosis in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Toxicol Sci 120:403-12
Robinson, Joshua F; Yu, Xiaozhong; Moreira, Estefania G et al. (2011) Arsenic- and cadmium-induced toxicogenomic response in mouse embryos undergoing neurulation. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 250:117-29
Robinson, Joshua F; Griffith, William C; Yu, Xiaozhong et al. (2010) Methylmercury induced toxicogenomic response in C57 and SWV mouse embryos undergoing neural tube closure. Reprod Toxicol 30:284-91
Robinson, Joshua F; Port, Jesse A; Yu, Xiaozhong et al. (2010) Integrating genetic and toxicogenomic information for determining underlying susceptibility to developmental disorders. Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol 88:920-30
Costa, Lucio G; Giordano, Gennaro; Faustman, Elaine M (2010) Domoic acid as a developmental neurotoxin. Neurotoxicology 31:409-23

Showing the most recent 10 out of 37 publications