Historically, devices used in children were originally only designed and produced for adults. Thus many of these devices are poorly designed for the pediatric physiology and anatomy. The Atlantic Pediatric Device Consortium (APDC) was created to assist academic entrepreneurs and small businesses to obtain the expertise that they need to move their technologies forward to commercialization. The group's expertise includes device engineering, access to appropriate animal models, design of clinical trials with access to relevant pediatric populations, and identification of the best clinical application for introduction of a technology into the marketplae. With more efficient development of pediatric devices, the benefit to cost ratio can be improved for these products with smaller markets. The APDC is a public and private partnership designed to increase the accessibility of devices to children that will improve their health. The mission of the APDC is to enhance the lives of children through the development of novel pediatric medical devices, which are both safe and effective. The consortium aims to provide an environment of creativity while providing expert assistance to design and test new pediatric devices. With renewed funding, the goals of the APDC are to: 1) provide a comprehensive, regional device consortium that serves as a resource for individuals and institutions interested in developing medical devices to meet the unique medical needs of children;2) innovate sustainable processes for identification of critical needs, pathways for evaluation of multiple concepts, and development of pediatric device solutions with potential for commercialization;and 3) assist in the development of 50 new devices over five years through an annual seed grant competition. The APDC will provide experienced strategic analysis and detailed advice on the efficient product development of medical devices to meet the complex objectives of device design and testing, clinical effectiveness and safety, regulatory requirements, and financing.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
2P50FD004193-03
Application #
8673837
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZFD1-OPD-L (S))
Project Start
2011-09-15
Project End
2018-08-31
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Georgia Institute of Technology
Department
Engineering (All Types)
Type
Schools of Engineering
DUNS #
097394084
City
Atlanta
State
GA
Country
United States
Zip Code
30332
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