The Animal Research Core maintains existing and establishes new protocols for producing burn injury and investigating metabolic patterns and the cellular and molecular changes that occur in murine tissues and blood following burn injury that recapitulate development of the hypermetabolic response to injury that occur in human patients with burn injury. The interpretation of results from murine models can help us redesign the models to more closely mimic the situation in human burn patients. Such studies are essential for the development of effective therapeutic strategies to prevent the occurrence of potentially fatal complications in seriously burned patients. This facility ensures that all investigators in the center produce burn injuries with uniform, reproducible results. In addition, we assist investigators in producing trans-genic animals. To facilitate interpretation and comparison of results from the different projects in the center, we strive to have all murine studies performed with animals that have a common genetic background. Preparation for and performance of the complex animal models used in the Burn Trauma Center can be problematic for young investigators and research fellows without substantial previous experience with the techniques involved. In this context the Animal Research Core is extremely helpful in the pre- and post-operative care of study animals and assumes the administrative responsibilities for animal care. This has provided consistency and reproducibility within and between studies and has insured that animal welfare is maintained. Specific services to the Burn Trauma Center that are provided by the Animal Research Core include: 1. maintenance of a central facility and technical staff that is equipped to set-up and maintain uniform, complex animal models of burn injury,. 2, assumption of the responsibility that all animal studies funded by the Center are current and up-to-date and that all procedures follow strict humane guidelines, 3. maintenance of a library of books and protocols related to the performance of animal procedures that is freely available to center investigators

Public Health Relevance

The Animal Research Core maintains existing and establishes new protocols for producing burn injury and investigating metabolic patterns and the cellular and molecular changes that occur in murine tissues and blood following burn injury that recapitulate development of the hypermetabolic response to injury that occur in human patients with burn injury.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50GM021700-33
Application #
8668975
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZGM1-PPBC-5)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
33
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$210,861
Indirect Cost
$59,792
Name
Massachusetts General Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
073130411
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02199
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Watada, Susumu; Yu, Yong-Ming; Fischman, Alan J et al. (2014) Evaluation of intragastric vs intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests in the evaluation of insulin resistance in a rodent model of burn injury and glucagon-like polypeptide-1 treatment. J Burn Care Res 35:e66-72
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Khan, Mohammed A S; Sahani, Nita; Neville, Kevin A et al. (2014) Nonsurgically induced disuse muscle atrophy and neuromuscular dysfunction upregulates alpha7 acetylcholine receptors. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 92:1-8
Ueda, Masashi; Iwasaki, Hajime; Wang, Shuxing et al. (2014) Cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, AM251, attenuates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury. Anesthesiology 121:1311-9
Ibrahim, Amir; Fagan, Shawn; Keaney, Tim et al. (2014) A simple cost-saving measure: 2.5% mafenide acetate solution. J Burn Care Res 35:349-53
Shank, Erik S; Martyn, Jeevendra A; Donelan, Mathias B et al. (2014) Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia for Pediatric Burn Reconstructive Surgery: A Prospective Study. J Burn Care Res :

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