The work of CpG 1.0 clarified the current range of issues facing genomic science. In examining issues ranging from exclusive licensing, to academic research practices in "open source" projects and the effect of patents on diagnostics, it showed a very different pattern than that predicted by the received wisdom. Some issues were not as problematic as had been perceived, while other problems in the research process had evaded attention. In focusing on the future of genomics as information. Project 1 moves beyond this established base to deal with emerging problems that could threaten some of our most promising new technologies. The empirical analysis and comparative study to the IT industries provided by this theme should yield vital insights to both scholars and policy makers.

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Duke University
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