The primary objective of this Administrative Core is to ensure the effective integration and interaction of the scientists and other personnel working on the Projects and Scientific Cores that comprise this Center. First, the Core establishes the scientific priorities and directions of the research through regular meetings of the Center's Executive Committee. Second, the Core is responsible for administering the day-to-day activities of the Center, including the monitoring of all budgets, submission of progress reports, and adherence to regulatory requirements associated with our research. Third, the Core coordinates the many modes of communication among Center investigators, including regular Webex meetings, videoconferences, and face- to-face visits that ensure our integrated research program. Likewise, the Core supports visits to New York by members of our External Advisory Committee, and key consultants, to meet with Center faculty and trainees and review the progress of our research. Fourth, the Core will create and then maintain a creative Center website to foster communication not only among Center investigators, but also with the scientific community and general public at large. Such communication includes resource and data sharing and the dissemination of vast amounts of genome-wide chromatin and gene expression data as rapidly as possible as well as enabling the free download of novel software packages designed to analyze complex datasets. Fifth, the Core fosters several additional outreach efforts to patient advocacy and community organizations. Sixth, the Core, through the Executive Committee, works to ensure the successful career paths of numerous junior faculty as well as student and postdoctoral trainees. We expect numerous individual R and K grants and NRSAs to be generated by the Center's research. Such career development will focus in particular on the recruitment and retention of women and minority scientists;we are proud of our track record in this regard. Seventh, the Core is responsible, in collaboration with our various training programs, to ensure the safe and ethical conduct of research. Joining together effectively to form a unified research team is key to the success of this large undertaking, and we are confident in our ability to accomplish this goal.

Public Health Relevance

Depression has a lifetime risk of ~15% for the U.S. general population, yet available antidepressant therapies are based on serendipitous discoveries over 6 decades ago, and fully treat <50% of all affected individuals. An improved understanding of the molecular basis of depression will lead to improved treatments and diagnostic tests-a high priority for the National Institutes of Health.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50MH096890-02
Application #
8463043
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-S)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$123,895
Indirect Cost
$50,801
Name
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Department
Type
DUNS #
078861598
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10029
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Lorsch, Zachary S; Loh, Yong-Hwee Eddie; Purushothaman, Immanuel et al. (2018) Estrogen receptor ? drives pro-resilient transcription in mouse models of depression. Nat Commun 9:1116
Aleyasin, Hossein; Flanigan, Meghan E; Russo, Scott J (2018) Neurocircuitry of aggression and aggression seeking behavior: nose poking into brain circuitry controlling aggression. Curr Opin Neurobiol 49:184-191
Hultman, Rainbo; Ulrich, Kyle; Sachs, Benjamin D et al. (2018) Brain-wide Electrical Spatiotemporal Dynamics Encode Depression Vulnerability. Cell 173:166-180.e14
Zhang, Song; Zhang, Hongxing; Ku, Stacy M et al. (2018) Sex Differences in the Neuroadaptations of Reward-related Circuits in Response to Subchronic Variable Stress. Neuroscience 376:108-116

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