This subproject is one of many research subprojects utilizing the resources provided by a Center grant funded by NIH/NCRR. Primary support for the subproject and the subproject's principal investigator may have been provided by other sources, including other NIH sources. The Total Cost listed for the subproject likely represents the estimated amount of Center infrastructure utilized by the subproject, not direct funding provided by the NCRR grant to the subproject or subproject staff. The primate amygdala is a complex brain region comprised of 13 nuclei and cortical regions in the rostral portion of the medial temporal lobe. This grant has funded studies with the overarching goal of defining the cytoarchitectonic organization and intrinsic and extrinsic connections of the macaque monkey amygdaloid complex. We have also been investigating neuropathology in the autistic amygdala. We reported (Schumann et al, 2004) that the amygdala in typically developing boys undergoes a 40% increase in volume between 7 and 18 years of age. This expansion occurs at a time when the cerebral volume decreases by about 10%. In boys with autism, the amygdala reaches its adult size by 7 years and does not increase thereafter. Given the association of the amygdala with a variety of psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, autism and schizophrenia, many of which are first manifest during the peripubertal period, it would be valuable to determine the morphological features of the amygdala's postnatal development. It is not feasible, however, to carry out this type of analysis in postmortem human brains.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Primate Research Center Grants (P51)
Project #
5P51RR000169-50
Application #
8357231
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-CM-5 (01))
Project Start
2011-05-01
Project End
2012-04-30
Budget Start
2011-05-01
Budget End
2012-04-30
Support Year
50
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$75,629
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California Davis
Department
Veterinary Sciences
Type
Schools of Veterinary Medicine
DUNS #
047120084
City
Davis
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
95618
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Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa et al. (2016) Performing monkeys of Bangladesh: characterizing their source and genetic variation. Primates 57:221-30
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