The proposed study seeks to explain the occurrence and course of binge drinking, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence in young adulthood (ages 21 to 30) in the Seattle Social Development Project (SSDP) panel. SSDP is a theory-driven, longitudinal study of child and adolescent predictors of health and behavior problems and prosocial development. The SSDP panel was constituted when 808 participants were in the 5th grade in 1985. The data include longitudinal measures of alcohol use and related behaviors, DIS/DSM-IV diagnostic assessments (including alcohol abuse and dependence) at ages 21, 24, 27, and 30, and multiple measures from multiple reporters of individual, family, school, peer, and neighborhood factors and characteristics. We seek three years of support to complete analyses of 12 waves of data collected from age 10 through age 30 from the gender-balanced SSDP panel of 808 multiethnic urban youths from high-crime neighborhoods in Seattle. This multi-informant database will allow us to understand the relationship between childhood and adolescent patterns of alcohol use and young adult binge drinking, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence through age 30. We also seek to identify social development factors in childhood and adolescence that may directly predict adult binge drinking, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence or moderate the effects of childhood and adolescent patterns of alcohol use on these young adult outcomes. Further we seek to understand the contribution of specific life events during young adulthood, such as entry into and exit from marriage, parenthood, and work, as well as other social development influences in young adulthood on binge drinking and alcohol abuse and dependence. For example, we will also pursue understanding why some young adults with alcohol problem use early in adulthood persist while others desist from problem alcohol use. The study offers a unique and cost-effective opportunity to examine important developmental influences on alcohol abuse and dependence in young adulthood by capitalizing on an existing longitudinal data set that spans development from age 10 through age 30. The study will provide information of use to those designing preventive and treatment interventions for alcohol misuse, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed study examines the occurrence and course of binge drinking, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence in young adulthood (ages 21 to 30) in the Seattle Social Development Project panel. The study seeks to understand the relationship between childhood and adolescent patterns of alcohol use and young adult binge drinking, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence through age 30, and the role of social- developmental factors in influencing these patterns. The study will provide information of use to those designing preventive and treatment interventions for alcohol misuse, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01AA016960-03
Application #
8018049
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-RPHB-A (03))
Program Officer
Shirley, Mariela
Project Start
2009-01-15
Project End
2012-12-31
Budget Start
2011-01-01
Budget End
2012-12-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$369,987
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Washington
Department
None
Type
Schools of Social Work
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
Lee, J O; Kosterman, R; Jones, T M et al. (2016) Mechanisms linking high school graduation to health disparities in young adulthood: a longitudinal analysis of the role of health behaviours, psychosocial stressors, and health insurance. Public Health 139:61-69
Lee, Jungeun Olivia; Hill, Karl G; Hartigan, Lacey A et al. (2015) Unemployment and substance use problems among young adults: Does childhood low socioeconomic status exacerbate the effect? Soc Sci Med 143:36-44
Kosterman, Rick; Hill, Karl G; Lee, Jungeun Olivia et al. (2014) Young adult social development as a mediator of alcohol use disorder symptoms from age 21 to 30. Psychol Addict Behav 28:348-58
Lee, Jungeun Olivia; Hill, Karl G; Guttmannova, Katarina et al. (2014) Childhood and adolescent predictors of heavy episodic drinking and alcohol use disorder at ages 21 and 33: a domain-specific cumulative risk model. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 75:684-94
Epstein, Marina; Hill, Karl G; Bailey, Jennifer A et al. (2013) The effect of general and drug-specific family environments on comorbid and drug-specific problem behavior: a longitudinal examination. Dev Psychol 49:1151-64
Meacham, Meredith C; Bailey, Jennifer A; Hill, Karl G et al. (2013) Alcohol and tobacco use disorder comorbidity in young adults and the influence of romantic partner environments. Drug Alcohol Depend 132:149-57
Lee, Jungeun Olivia; Hill, Karl G; Guttmannova, Katarina et al. (2012) The effects of general and alcohol-specific peer factors in adolescence on trajectories of alcohol abuse disorder symptoms from 21 to 33 years. Drug Alcohol Depend 121:213-9
Lee, Jungeun Olivia; Kosterman, Rick; McCarty, Carolyn A et al. (2012) Can patterns of alcohol use disorder in young adulthood help explain gender differences in depression? Compr Psychiatry 53:1071-7
Guttmannova, Katarina; Hill, Karl G; Bailey, Jennifer A et al. (2012) Examining explanatory mechanisms of the effects of early alcohol use on young adult alcohol dependence. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 73:379-90
Guttmannova, Katarina; Bailey, Jennifer A; Hill, Karl G et al. (2011) Sensitive periods for adolescent alcohol use initiation: predicting the lifetime occurrence and chronicity of alcohol problems in adulthood. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 72:221-31

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