Slip-related falls often cause injury;these often have catastrophic consequences, even among the healthiest older persons. We have shown that, with motor training by repeated exposure to slips during walking, young adults are able to traverse a potential slipping hazard without losing their balance, regardless of whether a slip actually occurs or not. It is highly unlikely that these effects could be attributed to education or heightened awareness of the slipping threat alone. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that these improved motor skills acquired from a single session can be retained for at least 4-6 months upon re-testing, making such intervention highly attractive. Of greater interest, however, is the extent to which older adults can acquire and retain similar protective skills upon such training. This has not been tested to date. Also unknown is how potential confounding factors such as an older adult's functional status might interact with the training. These issues are of importance in that establishing a retainable prophylactic training regimen against slip-related falls would, without doubt, have major public health implications. In this study, we will demonstrate that older adults can significantly reduce their near-term risk of backward balance loss and falls through motor training by repeated exposure to simulated slips interspersed with no-slip trials. We will verify that awareness or observational learning alone cannot substitute for motor training through an awareness-control group. We will then determine the extent to which adaptive improvements are retained over the course of a year. Finally, we will verify that although a single slip exposure may yield some retainable effect, this intensity control group will exhibit significantly less favorable long-term effect on the control of center of mass stability, body weight support, balance loss and fall upon slipping than the motor training group with repeated slips. In addition, we expect that the intensity-control group will also have a higher self-reported incidence of falls during the 12-month period than the motor training group with multiple slip exposure. PUBLIC HEALTH REVELANCE: Slip-related falls often cause injury;these often have catastrophic consequences, even among the healthiest older persons. Establishing a retainable preventive training regimen against slip-related falls would, without doubt, have major public health implications. In this study, we will demonstrate that older adults can significantly reduce their near-term risk of backward balance loss and falls through motor training with multiple protected slip exposure, and such adaptive improvements from such prophylactic training regimen can be retained over the course of a year.

Public Health Relevance

Slip-related falls often cause injury;these often have catastrophic consequences, even among the healthiest older persons. Establishing a retainable preventive training regimen against slip-related falls would, without doubt, have major public health implications. In this study, we will demonstrate that older adults can significantly reduce their near-term risk of backward balance loss and falls through motor training with multiple protected slip exposure, and such adaptive improvements from such prophylactic training regimen can be retained over the course of a year.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01AG029616-05
Application #
8304235
Study Section
Motor Function, Speech and Rehabilitation Study Section (MFSR)
Program Officer
Joseph, Lyndon
Project Start
2008-09-01
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$304,850
Indirect Cost
$109,774
Name
University of Illinois at Chicago
Department
Other Health Professions
Type
Schools of Allied Health Profes
DUNS #
098987217
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60612
Pai, Yi-Chung; Bhatt, Tanvi; Yang, Feng et al. (2014) Perturbation training can reduce community-dwelling older adults' annual fall risk: a randomized controlled trial. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 69:1586-94
Yang, Feng; Pai, Yi-Chung (2014) Adaptive control of center of mass (global) motion and its joint (local) origin in gait. J Biomech 47:2797-800
Zhang, Mei-Zhen; Yang, Feng; Wang, Edward et al. (2014) Association between anthropometric factors and falls in community-dwelling older adults during a simulated slip while walking. J Am Geriatr Soc 62:1808-10
Yang, Feng; Wang, Ting-Yun; Pai, Yi-Chung (2014) Reduced intensity in gait-slip training can still improve stability. J Biomech 47:2330-8
Pai, Yi-Chung; Yang, Feng; Bhatt, Tanvi et al. (2014) Learning from laboratory-induced falling: long-term motor retention among older adults. Age (Dordr) 36:9640
Bhatt, T; Wang, T-Y; Yang, F et al. (2013) Adaptation and generalization to opposing perturbations in walking. Neuroscience 246:435-50
Bhatt, Tanvi; Yang, Feng; Mak, Margaret K Y et al. (2013) Effect of externally cued training on dynamic stability control during the sit-to-stand task in people with Parkinson disease. Phys Ther 93:492-503
Yang, Feng; Pai, Clive Yi-Chung (2013) Alteration in community-dwelling older adults' level walking following perturbation training. J Biomech 46:2463-8
Yang, Feng; Bhatt, Tanvi; Pai, Yi-Chung (2013) Generalization of treadmill-slip training to prevent a fall following a sudden (novel) slip in over-ground walking. J Biomech 46:63-9
Wang, Ting-Yun; Bhatt, Tanvi; Yang, Feng et al. (2012) Adaptive control reduces trip-induced forward gait instability among young adults. J Biomech 45:1169-75

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