Scientists and laypeople have long been fascinated by the senses. Aristotle distinguished four of them, each linked with one of the four elements - vision with water, sound with air, smell with fire, and touch with earth. Since that time we have become aware of many more, including those involving position or pain. Now, research across a range of disciplines has revealed that sensory perception is capable of modulating many aspects of physiology and health. Indeed, evidence from work in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and from our work in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has established that aging is strongly modulated by sensory systems and that this modulation is evolutionarily conserved. Apfeld and Kenyon used the nematode model to show that suppression of sensory input could extend lifespan. Subsequent work from our lab and others has extended these results to Drosophila and revealed an increasingly nuanced relationship between sensory perception and aging. For example, some sensory neurons enhance longevity while others suppress it. In this renewal, we build upon the results from the parent award to continue our dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which sensory perception and the interpretation of sensory experiences in the brain modulate health and lifespan. Having established specific olfactory and gustatory manipulations that modulate aging, we will begin by determining the extent to which these sensory modalities act through overlapping or distinct mechanisms to modulate aging. We will then build on our knowledge of specific neuropeptides and neuro- signaling molecules that influence longevity to interrogate functionally relevant groups of neurons in the fly brain and identify those capable of modulating lifespan. Recent discoveries from our laboratory and others have revealed cause and effect relationships linking the neurobiology of perception to complex behavioral outputs;thus making Drosophila arguably the most relevant, powerful, and flexible model system to dissect the mechanisms underlying central control of aging and whole-organism physiology. We believe that harnessing the neurobiology of simple model systems to study the biological impact of sensory systems will yield insights into the broad influence of sensory perception across taxa. In support of this view, there is evidence to suggest that human sensory perception can modulate health and aging in response to social and nutritional cues in ways that we do not yet understand. In addition to providing an opportunity to discover basic mechanisms of aging, therefore, our work may also lead to creative intervention strategies for humans.

Public Health Relevance

Recent research has shown that sensory perception is capable of modulating many aspects of physiology and health, and our previous work in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has established that aging is also strongly modulated by sensory systems through mechanisms that are largely unknown. Our studies will use genetic analysis to investigate central control of aging and physiology in Drosophila to illuminate how similar processes may control healthy aging in mammals.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01AG030593-07
Application #
8635966
Study Section
Cellular Mechanisms in Aging and Development Study Section (CMAD)
Program Officer
Chen, Wen G
Project Start
2007-06-01
Project End
2018-02-28
Budget Start
2014-03-01
Budget End
2015-02-28
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$313,853
Indirect Cost
$108,853
Name
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Department
Physiology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
073133571
City
Ann Arbor
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48109
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Ro, Jennifer; Harvanek, Zachary M; Pletcher, Scott D (2014) FLIC: high-throughput, continuous analysis of feeding behaviors in Drosophila. PLoS One 9:e101107
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Kabil, Hadise; Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma et al. (2011) Increased transsulfuration mediates longevity and dietary restriction in Drosophila. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:16831-6
Linford, Nancy J; Kuo, Tsung-Han; Chan, Tammy P et al. (2011) Sensory perception and aging in model systems: from the outside in. Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 27:759-85
Poon, Peter C; Kuo, Tsung-Han; Linford, Nancy J et al. (2010) Carbon dioxide sensing modulates lifespan and physiology in Drosophila. PLoS Biol 8:e1000356

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