For years, studies have shown that brain estrogen and estrogen receptors are critical for neuronal cell functions, yet the signal pathways and regulatory mechanisms that control estrogen function remain main unclear. It is generally believed that the reduction of estrogen after menopause in females contributes to the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is an intense search for therapies related to estrogen that might provide significant benefits while avoiding the negative aspects associated with estrogen therapy. Among many such approaches, the transcriptional regulatory function of brain estrogen receptors is the most prevalent form of regulatory cellular function, although our knowledge about the role of estrogen receptors in AD is very limited. Recently, studies have shown that the two estrogen receptors, alpha and beta (ER? and ER?), may have different functions in term of aging physiology and prevention of AD (Yamaguchi-Shima 2007, Porrello et al. 2006, Corbo et al. 2006, Pirskanen et al. 2005, Yaffe K 2007, Combarros 2007, Carroll and Pike, 2008). Our recent studies demonstrated a reduction in brain estrogen levels as well as ER? protein expression in female AD patients (Yue et al. 2005). However, very little are known about the cellular and molecular functions of brain ER? and ER? and how loss of their functions causes neurodegeneration in AD. To identify the molecular mechanisms of estrogen receptor function in preventing AD, we will use a gene-targeting approach to delete either one of the receptors, ER? or ER? in an Alzheimer's transgenic mouse model, APP23, to define the role of each estrogen receptor in neuronal protection and APP processing in AD. In this proposal, we will test the hypothesis that brain ER? and ER? are involved in distinct signal transduction pathways against amyloid pathology and cognitive functions in the AD brain.

Public Health Relevance

For years, studies have shown that brain estrogen and estrogen receptors are critical for neuronal cell functions, yet the signal pathways and regulatory mechanisms that control estrogen function remain main unclear. It is generally believed that the reduction of estrogen after menopause in females contributes to the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is an intense search for therapies related to estrogen that might provide significant benefits while avoiding the negative aspects associated with estrogen therapy. Among many such approaches, the transcriptional regulatory function of brain estrogen receptors is the most prevalent form of regulatory cellular function, although our knowledge about the role of estrogen receptors in AD is very limited. Recently, studies have shown that the two estrogen receptors, alpha and beta (ER? and ER?), may have different functions in term of aging physiology and prevention of AD (Yamaguchi-Shima 2007, Porrello et al. 2006, Corbo et al. 2006, Pirskanen et al. 2005, Yaffe K 2007, Combarros 2007, Carroll and Pike, 2008). Our recent studies demonstrated a reduction in brain estrogen levels as well as ER? protein expression in female AD patients (Yue et al. 2005). However, very little are known about the cellular and molecular functions of brain ER? and ER? and how loss of their functions causes neurodegeneration in AD. To identify the molecular mechanisms of estrogen receptor function in preventing AD, we will use a gene-targeting approach to delete either one of the receptors, ER? or ER? in an Alzheimer's transgenic mouse model, APP23, to define the role of each estrogen receptor in neuronal protection and APP processing in AD. In this proposal, we will test the hypothesis that brain ER? and ER? are involved in distinct signal transduction pathways against amyloid pathology and cognitive functions in the AD brain.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
7R01AG032441-04
Application #
8197400
Study Section
Cell Death in Neurodegeneration Study Section (CDIN)
Program Officer
Miller, Marilyn
Project Start
2009-08-15
Project End
2013-06-30
Budget Start
2011-09-30
Budget End
2012-06-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$303,343
Indirect Cost
Name
Roskamp Institute, Inc.
Department
Type
DUNS #
119173933
City
Sarasota
State
FL
Country
United States
Zip Code
34243
Zhang, Zhengrong; Huang, Jing; Shen, Yong et al. (2017) BACE1-Dependent Neuregulin-1 Signaling: An Implication for Schizophrenia. Front Mol Neurosci 10:302
Zhang, Xinzhu; Yang, Jian; Li, Yuhong et al. (2017) Sex chromosome abnormalities and psychiatric diseases. Oncotarget 8:3969-3979
Shen, Yong; Wang, Haibo; Sun, Qiying et al. (2017) Increased Plasma Beta-Secretase 1 May Predict Conversion to Alzheimer's Disease Dementia in Individuals With Mild Cognitive Impairment. Biol Psychiatry :
Sun, Qiying; Xie, Nina; Tang, Beisha et al. (2017) Alzheimer's Disease: From Genetic Variants to the Distinct Pathological Mechanisms. Front Mol Neurosci 10:319
Shen, Yong; Li, Rena (2016) What do we know from clinical trials on exercise and Alzheimer's disease? J Sport Health Sci 5:397-399
Zhou, Yuehui; Zhao, Min; Zhou, Chenglin et al. (2016) Sex differences in drug addiction and response to exercise intervention: From human to animal studies. Front Neuroendocrinol 40:24-41
Li, Rena; Ma, Xin; Wang, Gang et al. (2016) Why sex differences in schizophrenia? J Transl Neurosci 1:37-42
Li, Rena (2016) Physical activity and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. J Sport Health Sci 5:381-382
Li, Cuicui; Zhou, Chenglin; Li, Rena (2016) Can Exercise Ameliorate Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Cognitive Decline in Breast Cancer Patients? Mol Neurobiol 53:4238-4246
Cheng, Xin; Shen, Yong; Li, Rena (2014) Targeting TNF: a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease. Drug Discov Today 19:1822-1827

Showing the most recent 10 out of 32 publications