More than 40 million HIV-infected people live in the developing world, yet it is estimated that only one in ten persons infected with HIV has been tested and knows his/her HIV status1. The U.S National Intelligence Council (NIC) predicted that the number of HIV-infected individuals in the developing world will rise to 80 million by 20102. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV has been available in developed countries for more than a decade. However, worldwide, less than 10% (1.3 million) of the infected individuals currently receive treatment, since they live in developing countries. Part of the problem associated with existing ART delivery systems are the limitations of conventional methods to diagnose and monitor infected individuals living in rural poor communities. To increase access to HIV care and to improve treatment outcome requires development of low-cost diagnostic tools for developing countries3-6. We propose to develop a low-cost point-of-care HIV diagnostic tool for the developing world. At the interface between Harvard and MIT we have access to the necessary infrastructure. Moreover, the PI was recognized as one of the top 35 young innovators of the world for his work on HIV diagnostic microchips for Global Health. More than 40 million HIV-infected people live in the developing world, yet it is estimated that only one in ten persons infected with HIV has been tested and knows his/her HIV status1 and we propose to develop a low-cost point-of-care HIV diagnostic tool for the developing world.

Public Health Relevance

More than 40 million HIV-infected people live in the developing world, yet it is estimated that only one in ten persons infected with HIV has been tested and knows his/her HIV status1 and we propose to develop a low-cost point-of-care HIV diagnostic tool for the developing world.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01AI081534-05
Application #
8427366
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-AARR-E (16))
Program Officer
Livnat, Daniella
Project Start
2009-03-03
Project End
2014-02-28
Budget Start
2013-03-01
Budget End
2014-02-28
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$411,128
Indirect Cost
$180,804
Name
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
030811269
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02115
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