An effective vaccine is needed for prevention of HIV-1 transmission. This proposal will test in the SIV-rhesus macaque model of HIV-1 transmission to women the concept that extraordinarily large numbers of SIV-specific CTLs generated by a novel heterologous prime-boost strategy can confer protection by eliminating small founder populations of infected cells at the portal of entry. Flow cytometric and in situ methods of in situ tetramer staining and hybridization will be used to document at relevant tissue sites the large numbers of virus specific CD8 T cells and their interactions with SIV-infected cells. Success of this strategy should enable vaccine design. An effective vaccine to prevent HIV-1 is urgently needed. In this proposal a novel approach to developing such a vaccine is described with tests of its efficacy in the SIV-rhesus macaque model of HIV-1 transmission to women.

Public Health Relevance

An effective vaccine to prevent HIV-1 is urgently needed. In this proposal a novel approach to developing such a vaccine is described with tests of its efficacy in the SIV-rhesus macaque model of HIV-1 transmission to women.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01AI090732-04
Application #
8492021
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-EB-A (M1))
Program Officer
Miller, Nancy R
Project Start
2010-07-01
Project End
2014-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$672,484
Indirect Cost
$141,641
Name
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Department
Microbiology/Immun/Virology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
555917996
City
Minneapolis
State
MN
Country
United States
Zip Code
55455