Rationale: A food-based approach to cancer chemoprevention emphasizes the potential for complex mixtures of preventive agents in whole foods to inhibit multiple processes of carcinogenesis. Supporting this, several preclinical animal studies have been conducted that demonstrate the remarkable chemopreventive activity of lyophilyzed black raspberries [LBR] on tumor development, including oral cancer. Preliminary data by us demonstrate that short-term in situ delivery of LBR can modulate the expression of key regulatory genes in cancer cells and "at-risk normal" oral mucosa of pre-surgical cancer patients that may favor the prevention of cancer development. Hypothesis: Long-term daily exposure of LBR by post-surgical head and neck [HN] cancer patients will modulate expression of genes critical in the development of oral cancer. This modulation may predict the preventive potential of LBR in human oral carcinogenesis. Experimental Approach: Phase IBIIA post-surgical clinical trials will be conducted in 210 individuals following surgical resection of stage I or II HN cancers. Daily LBR doses (0, 4, 8 gm) in two delivery systems will be given for a period of six months. Oral cavity scrapings, blood, urine, and saliva will be collected at selected time points and evaluated for outcomes of adherance/exposure, safety/toxicity, and capacity to modulate specific gene expressions associated with carcinogenic progression.
Specific Aims :
Aim 1. Determine the adherence of post-surgical patients to clinical trial design expectations and define tolerability and, potential adverse effects of long-term LBR administration.
Aim 2. Determine the interrelationships between exposure, dose and delivery vehicle, and uptake of LBR components in oral tissues.
Aim 3. Evaluate the ability of LBR to modulate gene expression in ?high-risk? oral mucosa of post-surgical oral cancer.
Aim 4. Analyze for the persistence of modulation genes following cessation of LBR treatment. This novel translational study will provide essential data establishing the scientific foundation for experimental and design parameters to be included in a future Phase III randomized clinical trial and is the first to examine the molecular effects of long-term LBR administration on ?at-risk? oral mucosa in post-surgical cancer patients. It will also provide valuable insights related to the modulation of critical genes that might lead to oral cancer prevention.

Public Health Relevance

This novel translational study will provide essential data establishing the scientific foundation for experimental and design parameters to be included in a future Phase III randomized clinical trial and is the first to examine the molecular effects of long-term LBR administration on ?at-risk? oral mucosa in post-surgical cancer patients and will provide valuable insights related to the modulation of critical genes that might lead to oral cancer prevention.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01CA127368-05
Application #
8197486
Study Section
Chemo/Dietary Prevention Study Section (CDP)
Program Officer
Seifried, Harold E
Project Start
2007-12-01
Project End
2013-11-30
Budget Start
2011-12-01
Budget End
2013-11-30
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$301,913
Indirect Cost
$100,638
Name
Ohio State University
Department
Public Health & Prev Medicine
Type
Schools of Public Health
DUNS #
832127323
City
Columbus
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
43210
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