Knowledge Integration in Quitlines: Networks that Improve Cessation (KIQ NIC) Abstract One in every five deaths in the U.S. is related to tobacco use, and it remains the leading preventable cause of premature death. Given the highly complex nature of tobacco use as a public health threat, the National Cancer Institute supported an initiative and a recently published tobacco control monograph designed to describe in what ways (systems thinking) might improve tobacco control efforts. In that monograph, NCI identified social network analysis and factors related to communication between individuals and groups as critical to understanding and improving the dissemination and implementation of best practices within organizations that are part of a complex adaptive system such as tobacco control (NCI, 2007). This investigative team was central to the NCI initiative and Monograph, and the proposed study is a direct extension of that initiative. The proposed study is designed to better understand the network and communications mechanisms by which stakeholders in an existing and well-defined tobacco control network } the North American Quitline Consortium (NAQC) } interact, share new evidence, make decisions on how and when to implement new knowledge, and actually adopt practices that they believe will improve quitline outcomes. The NAQC is funded by NCI, CDC and other organizations as a unique research-to-practice collaboration to support telephone- based tobacco cessation. As of 2006, every U. S. state (including D.C.) and every Canadian province had implemented a smoking cessation quitline, thus resulting in a population of 62 quitlines that will be included in the proposed study. Following a formative year of instrument development and team building between the researchers and NAQC members, three waves of social network and decision-making analyses will be implemented to analyze processes of adoption and implementation of new evidence and knowledge. In addition, actual quitline operations will be analyzed in order to track implementation of new practices, and multivariate modeling will assess the relative influences of network, decision-making, and other potential influences on adoption of new quitline practices. The results are expected to increase our understanding of how to bridge the gaps between researchers, services organizations, providers, and clients, and to explore how new knowledge} especially new scientific evidence} is disseminated, implemented, and integrated within the NAQC.

Public Health Relevance

One in every five deaths in the U.S. is related to tobacco use, and it remains the leading preventable cause of premature death. Fortunately, every state and Province in the U.S. and Canada, respectively, now has a free telephone quitline to help smokers quit. Unfortunately, we know little about how best practices and innovations are implemented in those quitlines. The proposed study is designed to better understand how the network of quitlines implements best practices and innovations. Three waves of social network and decision-making analyses will be implemented to analyze processes of adoption and implementation of new evidence and knowledge, and actual quitline operations will be analyzed in order to track implementation of new practices.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
7R01CA128638-05
Application #
8249457
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-HOP-X (50))
Program Officer
Ginexi, Elizabeth M
Project Start
2008-06-10
Project End
2014-04-30
Budget Start
2012-06-04
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$546,151
Indirect Cost
$126,222
Name
Mayo Clinic, Arizona
Department
Type
DUNS #
153665211
City
Scottsdale
State
AZ
Country
United States
Zip Code
85259
Saul, Jessie E; Bonito, Joseph A; Provan, Keith et al. (2014) Implementation of tobacco cessation quitline practices in the United States and Canada. Am J Public Health 104:e98-105
Giovino, Gary A; Kulak, Jessica A; Kalsbeek, William D et al. (2013) Research priorities for FCTC Articles 20, 21, and 22: surveillance/evaluation and information exchange. Nicotine Tob Res 15:847-61
Guy, Mignonne C; Seltzer, Ryan G N; Cameron, Michael et al. (2012) Relationship between smokers' modes of entry into quitlines and treatment outcomes. Am J Health Behav 36:3-11
Provan, Keith G; Beagles, Jonathan E; Leischow, Scott J (2011) Network formation, governance, and evolution in public health: the North American Quitline Consortium case. Health Care Manage Rev 36:315-26