Recent work from our group and others has provided a wealth of information regarding the genetic makeup of lymphomas and other tumors. However, it is unclear how these genetic mutations actually cause the disease and the degree to which they are associated with known biological processes and outcome. In this proposal, we seek to study how different genetic mutations are associated with known lymphoma phenotypes and the context-dependent roles of genetic mutations.

Public Health Relevance

High throughput sequencing and microarrays have provided new opportunities for unravelling tumor biology by the enumeration of differential mutation and/or expression of genes and oncogenic pathways. In this proposal, we develop a novel approach to better understanding the role of individual genes in the context of lymphomas. This knowledge is essential to the identification of better therapies in these patients.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
2R01CA136895-06A1
Application #
8761919
Study Section
Cancer Genetics Study Section (CG)
Program Officer
Jessup, John M
Project Start
2009-02-18
Project End
2019-08-31
Budget Start
2014-09-09
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
6
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$283,200
Indirect Cost
$103,200
Name
Duke University
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
044387793
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27705
Zhang, Jenny; Jima, Dereje; Moffitt, Andrea B et al. (2014) The genomic landscape of mantle cell lymphoma is related to the epigenetically determined chromatin state of normal B cells. Blood 123:2988-96
Zhang, Jenny; Grubor, Vladimir; Love, Cassandra L et al. (2013) Genetic heterogeneity of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:1398-403
Walsh, Katherine; McKinney, Matthew S; Love, Cassandra et al. (2013) PAK1 mediates resistance to PI3K inhibition in lymphomas. Clin Cancer Res 19:1106-15