There are limited quantitative methods to aid systematic design and development of drug delivery systems. We have developed a computational model that predicts the amount of drug that is delivered to the tumor, and we were able to make relevant predictions for ideal properties of liposomes from our models. The first goal of this grant application is the development of methods to measure tumor transport properties in vivo. The model is then validated, and will serve as platform for optimization of heat-activated liposomal carriers. The proposed approach thus aids the development of more effective drug delivery systems, and has general applicability for various drug delivery systems.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed work will result in computational models for design and testing of novel nanoparticles that deliver high amounts of chemotherapy to target areas. This project will aid the in design of advanced nanoparticle drug carriers that reduce side effects of current chemotherapies while improving drug delivery to tumors.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
1R01CA181664-01A1
Application #
8773292
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-SBIB-Z (58))
Program Officer
Farahani, Keyvan
Project Start
2014-09-25
Project End
2019-08-31
Budget Start
2014-09-25
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$289,439
Indirect Cost
$75,549
Name
Medical University of South Carolina
Department
Pediatrics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
183710748
City
Charleston
State
SC
Country
United States
Zip Code
29403