This application proposes to continue a nearly 40-year program of research that has monitored the substance use of American Indian (AI) youth living on or near reservations. It is the only study of its kind to provide ongoing surveillance data of what has historically been the most at-risk group of youth for substance use in the nation. We will continue to collect annual substance use data from 7-12th grade AI youth along with key risk and protective factors. Collection of new epidemiologic data will permit us to track recent trends in levels of use, with attention focused on recent high levels of marijuana and OxyContin and a resurgence in the use of inhalants. An additional component of this application will include the initiation of a longitudinal study of AI 6-7th grade middle school youth. This portion of the study is designed to answer (1) what is the nature of parent-child communication about drugs and alcohol, (2) what are the substance use trajectories, (3) what are the predictors and outcomes of early vs. late initiation, and (4) what explains the changing patterns of use from middle school to high school beyond the effects of school non-attendance/dropout. 2.

Public Health Relevance

This project will continue to monitor rates of substance use among American Indian youth living on or near reservations. This group of youth has consistently been the most at-risk group of youth in the nation. The project will also begin a new longitudinal study of American Indian middle school youth with focus on parent-child communication and substance use trajectories.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01DA003371-30
Application #
9413999
Study Section
Community Influences on Health Behavior Study Section (CIHB)
Program Officer
Etz, Kathleen
Project Start
1983-09-01
Project End
2020-01-31
Budget Start
2018-02-01
Budget End
2019-01-31
Support Year
30
Fiscal Year
2018
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Colorado State University-Fort Collins
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
785979618
City
Fort Collins
State
CO
Country
United States
Zip Code
80523
Stanley, Linda R; Swaim, Randall C; Dieterich, Sara E (2017) The Role of Norms in Marijuana Use Among American Indian Adolescents. Prev Sci 18:406-415
Prince, Mark A; Swaim, Randall C; Stanley, Linda R et al. (2017) Perceived harm as a mediator of the relationship between social norms and marijuana use and related consequences among American Indian youth. Drug Alcohol Depend 181:102-107
Spillane, Nichea S; Weyandt, Lisa; Oster, Danielle et al. (2017) Social contextual risk factors for stimulant use among adolescent American Indians. Drug Alcohol Depend 179:167-173
Swaim, Randall C; Stanley, Linda R (2016) Multivariate family factors in lifetime and current marijuana use among American Indian and white adolescents residing on or near reservations. Drug Alcohol Depend 169:92-100
Swaim, Randall C (2016) Moderating effects of perceived social benefits on inhalant initiation among American Indian and White youth. Psychol Addict Behav 30:398-405
Swaim, Randall C (2015) The moderating effects of perceived emotional benefits on inhalant initiation among American Indian and white youth. Am J Addict 24:554-60
Stanley, Linda R; Swaim, Randall C (2015) Initiation of alcohol, marijuana, and inhalant use by American-Indian and white youth living on or near reservations. Drug Alcohol Depend 155:90-6
Stanley, Linda R; Harness, Susan D; Swaim, Randall C et al. (2014) Rates of substance use of American Indian students in 8th, 10th, and 12th grades living on or near reservations: update, 2009-2012. Public Health Rep 129:156-63
Dieterich, Sara E; Stanley, Linda R; Swaim, Randall C et al. (2013) Outcome expectancies, descriptive norms, and alcohol use: American Indian and white adolescents. J Prim Prev 34:209-19
Swaim, Randall C; Stanley, Linda R; Beauvais, Fred (2013) The normative environment for substance use among American Indian students and white students attending schools on or near reservations. Am J Orthopsychiatry 83:422-9

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