The goal of this project is to examine biological and early developmental factors in patterns of substance use in young men from early adolescence to the transition to adulthood. The project builds on an ongoing prospective, longitudinal study of 310 high-risk young men who have been followed since infancy using multiple methods (e.g., observation, interview) and informants (e.g., parents, teachers, peers) and spanning child, family, and extra-familial risk factors. As participants undergo the transition to adulthood and face challenges in interpersonal and instrumental domains, the project will incorporate data on genetics and brain function to understand how these individual differences in underlying, emerging biology factors, separately and in combination, influence patterns of use for drugs, alcohol, and nicotine. Assessments of brain function will examine the contribution of function in mesolimbic and corticolimbic neural circuits at two time points by conducting functional MRI of participants'striatal reactivity to reward stimuli, amygdala reactivity to threat stimuli, resting cerebral blood flow, and resting functional connectivity. The inclusion of fMRI at this point in the longitudinal study will provide detailed information on the association between brain function and genetic factors, early development, social context, and substance use. The guiding hypothesis of the project is that stable characteristics such as a history of antisocial behavior and impulsivity;family and extra- familial contextual risk;brain function;and genetic variants associated with substance use- related brain function will contribute to longitudinal patterns of substance use. In addition, it is expected that the success participants have in establishing stable romantic relationships and employment/educational training during the transition to adulthood will attenuate associations between risk factors and patterns of substance use in early adulthood. The project provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine factors spanning from early childhood through early adulthood that are related to substance use and to link such data with data on genes and brain function during the transition from adolescence to adulthood using a low-income sample of ethnically diverse males at high risk for maladaptive adult functioning. Thus, the study offers the potential to advance our understanding of pathways to substance use problems and guide developmentally informed prevention and intervention efforts.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of this project is to examine biological and early developmental factors in patterns of substance use in young men from early adolescence to the transition to adulthood. The project builds on an ongoing prospective, longitudinal study of 310 high-risk young men who have been followed since infancy using multiple methods and informants, and spanning child, family, and extra-familial risk factors. These data will be linked with data on genes and brain function during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Thus, the study offers the potential to advance our understanding of pathways to substance use problems and guide developmentally informed prevention and intervention efforts.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
3R01DA026222-19S1
Application #
8525927
Study Section
Program Officer
Sirocco, Karen
Project Start
2012-09-15
Project End
2014-05-31
Budget Start
2012-09-15
Budget End
2013-05-31
Support Year
19
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$149,987
Indirect Cost
$50,344
Name
University of Pittsburgh
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
004514360
City
Pittsburgh
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
15213
Lichenstein, Sarah D; Musselman, Samuel; Shaw, Daniel S et al. (2017) Nucleus accumbens functional connectivity at age 20 is associated with trajectory of adolescent cannabis use and predicts psychosocial functioning in young adulthood. Addiction 112:1961-1970
Waller, Rebecca; Shaw, Daniel S; Hyde, Luke W (2017) Observed fearlessness and positive parenting interact to predict childhood callous-unemotional behaviors among low-income boys. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 58:282-291
Ordaz, Sarah J; Fritz, Barbara L; Forbes, Erika E et al. (2017) The influence of pubertal maturation on antisaccade performance. Dev Sci :
Morgan, Judith K; Shaw, Daniel S; Jacobs, Rachel H et al. (2017) Effect of maternal rumination and disengagement during childhood on offspring neural response to reward in late adolescence. Psychiatry Res 262:32-38
Galán, Chardée A; Choe, Daniel Ewon; Forbes, Erika E et al. (2017) Interactions between empathy and resting heart rate in early adolescence predict violent behavior in late adolescence and early adulthood. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 58:1370-1380
Gard, Arianna M; Waller, Rebecca; Shaw, Daniel S et al. (2017) The long reach of early adversity: Parenting, stress, and neural pathways to antisocial behavior in adulthood. Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging 2:582-590
Hasler, Brant P; Casement, Melynda D; Sitnick, Stephanie L et al. (2017) Eveningness among late adolescent males predicts neural reactivity to reward and alcohol dependence 2 years later. Behav Brain Res 327:112-120
Murray, Laura; Shaw, Daniel S; Forbes, Erika E et al. (2017) Reward-Related Neural Correlates of Antisocial Behavior and Callous-Unemotional Traits in Young Men. Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging 2:346-354
Womack, Sean R; Shaw, Daniel S; Weaver, Chelsea M et al. (2016) Bidirectional Associations Between Cannabis Use and Depressive Symptoms From Adolescence Through Early Adulthood Among At-Risk Young Men. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 77:287-97
Morgan, Judith K; Shaw, Daniel S; Olino, Thomas M et al. (2016) History of Depression and Frontostriatal Connectivity During Reward Processing in Late Adolescent Boys. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 45:59-68

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