Most everyday listening environments consist of a multitude of sounds, many of which are fluctuating in level over time. The way in which the brain sifts apart this acoustic complex into its constituent sound sources is referred to as auditory perceptual organization. The root interest of this project is in understanding the role of temporal processing in perceptual organization, and how aging and impaired auditory systems can compromise this ability. The focus of this project is on delineating the specific types of temporal processing deficits that emerge early in the aging process, and on differentiating these from deficits associated with advanced age and cochlear hearing loss. Three areas of temporal processing are investigated: (1) stimulus onsets and temporal fine structure;(2) temporal envelope coding;and (3) the relationship between temporal envelope processing and spectral integration in modulated maskers. The project utilizes both psychophysical and electrophysiological methodologies, and incorporates both speech and non-speech measures. The experiments test adults across a wide age range and include participants with normal hearing as well as hearing loss. Data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics, tests of correlation, and analyses of variance. The relevance of the project to public health is that it will lead to a clearer understanding of how the temporal features of sound are processed, and how changes in the auditory system due to age and hearing loss might affect these abilities. This research project is relevant to public health because it advances our understanding of how good hearing depends on the ability to process temporal features of sound. The project has direct application to hearing health because it is designed is to uncover how changes in the auditory system due to age and hearing loss affect the ability to process important temporal features.

Public Health Relevance

This research project is relevant to public health because it advances our understanding of how good hearing depends on the ability to process temporal features of sound. The project has direct application to hearing health because it is designed is to uncover how changes in the auditory system due to age and hearing loss affect the ability to process important temporal features.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01DC001507-19
Application #
8305148
Study Section
Auditory System Study Section (AUD)
Program Officer
Donahue, Amy
Project Start
1992-12-01
Project End
2013-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2013-08-31
Support Year
19
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$300,373
Indirect Cost
$96,730
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Otolaryngology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
Grose, John H; Porter, Heather L; Buss, Emily et al. (2016) Cochlear hearing loss and the detection of sinusoidal versus random amplitude modulation. J Acoust Soc Am 140:EL184
Grose, John H; Menezes, Denise C; Porter, Heather L et al. (2016) Masking Period Patterns and Forward Masking for Speech-Shaped Noise: Age-Related Effects. Ear Hear 37:48-54
Mamo, Sara K; Grose, John H; Buss, Emily (2016) Speech-evoked ABR: Effects of age and simulated neural temporal jitter. Hear Res 333:201-9
Grose, John H; Mamo, Sara K; Buss, Emily et al. (2015) Temporal Processing Deficits in Middle Age. Am J Audiol 24:91-3
Grose, John H; Griz, Silvana; Pacífico, Fernando A et al. (2015) Modulation masking release using the Brazilian-Portuguese HINT: psychometric functions and the effect of speech time compression. Int J Audiol 54:274-81
Grose, John H; Buss, Emily; Porter, Heather L et al. (2013) Across-frequency envelope correlation discrimination and masked signal detection. J Acoust Soc Am 134:1205-14
Grose, John H; Mamo, Sara K (2012) Frequency modulation detection as a measure of temporal processing: age-related monaural and binaural effects. Hear Res 294:49-54
Grose, John H; Mamo, Sara K (2012) Electrophysiological measurement of binaural beats: effects of primary tone frequency and observer age. Ear Hear 33:187-94
Grose, John H; Buss, Emily; Hall 3rd, Joseph W (2012) Binaural beat salience. Hear Res 285:40-5
Grose, John H; Mamo, Sara K (2010) Processing of temporal fine structure as a function of age. Ear Hear 31:755-60

Showing the most recent 10 out of 31 publications