The objectives of the proposed research continue to be an evaluation, characterization, and comparison of how the binaural auditory system processes interaural temporal disparities (ITDs), a major cue for the localization of sound. The program of research flows directly from our findings that the use of special """"""""transposed"""""""" high-frequency stimuli can overcome the typically poor ability of listeners to process ITDs within high-frequency channels. Not only do transposed stimuli lead to more efficient ITD-processing, they also appear to be relatively """"""""immune"""""""" to the degrading effects observed with conventional high-frequency stimuli, when other, """"""""jamming"""""""" or """"""""interfering,"""""""" low-frequency information is present. The proposed program of research seeks to reveal and understand what specific aspects of the envelopes of high-frequency temporal waveforms are sufficient for the processing of ITDs to be enhanced and for """"""""resistance"""""""" to binaural """"""""interference"""""""" to occur. In order to provide answers, we propose to employ a multi-faceted, convergent, and, we believe, innovative approach that exploits the combination of 1) a number of sophisticated computer- based techniques for controlling and quantifying via specific metrics the temporal characteristics of the envelopes of high-frequency stimuli;2) highly precise and repeatable behavioral measures of threshold-ITDs and ITD-based laterality;3) a type of theoretical approach that yields specific quantitative predictions about the patterning of the behavioral data in terms of either variations in the external stimulus, per se, or in terms of variations in the stimuli as processed by both peripheral and central stages of auditory processing. The relevance of the proposed research to public health includes potential health benefits stemming from a better understanding of how the ear and brain process envelope-based information. The results of our investigations promise to provide direction to others about how they can manipulate specific temporal aspects of the envelopes of high-frequency waveforms to convey more efficiently monaural as well as binaural timing information via prosthetic devices such as cochlear implants and/or digital hearing aids..

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01DC004147-10
Application #
7826742
Study Section
Auditory System Study Section (AUD)
Program Officer
Donahue, Amy
Project Start
2000-08-01
Project End
2012-05-31
Budget Start
2010-06-01
Budget End
2011-05-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$307,309
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Connecticut
Department
Surgery
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
022254226
City
Farmington
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06030
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2014) Sensitivity to envelope-based interaural delays at high frequencies: center frequency affects the envelope rate-limitation. J Acoust Soc Am 135:808-16
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2013) When and how envelope ""rate-limitations"" affect processing of interaural temporal disparities conveyed by high-frequency stimuli. Adv Exp Med Biol 787:263-71
Dietz, Mathias; Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine et al. (2013) The effect of overall level on sensitivity to interaural differences of time and level at high frequencies. J Acoust Soc Am 134:494-502
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2012) Lateralization produced by interaural temporal and intensitive disparities of high-frequency, raised-sine stimuli: data and modeling. J Acoust Soc Am 131:409-15
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2011) Lateralization produced by interaural intensitive disparities appears to be larger for high- vs low-frequency stimuli. J Acoust Soc Am 129:EL15-20
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2011) Lateralization produced by envelope-based interaural temporal disparities of high-frequency, raised-sine stimuli: empirical data and modeling. J Acoust Soc Am 129:1501-8
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2010) Accounting quantitatively for sensitivity to envelope-based interaural temporal disparities at high frequencies. J Acoust Soc Am 128:1224-34
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2009) How sensitivity to ongoing interaural temporal disparities is affected by manipulations of temporal features of the envelopes of high-frequency stimuli. J Acoust Soc Am 125:3234-42
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2008) Binaural signal detection, overall masking level, and masker interaural correlation: revisiting the internal noise hypothesis. J Acoust Soc Am 124:3850-60
Bernstein, Leslie R; Trahiotis, Constantine (2008) Discrimination of interaural temporal disparities conveyed by high-frequency sinusoidally amplitude-modulated tones and high-frequency transposed tones: effects of spectrally flanking noises. J Acoust Soc Am 124:3088-94

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