This project represents a continual effort to quantify the key biomechanical characteristics of human laryngeal tissues, so as to better understand the tissue mechanics of voice production, the potential mechanical factors responsible for voice disorders related to vocal overuse and trauma, and the mechanical manifestations of vocal fold scarring. The long-term goal is to provide mechanics-motivated guidelines for improving the prevention, diagnosis and management of voice disorders. To achieve this goal, the specific aims of this application include: (1) To quantify the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic response of the vocal fold lamina propria extracellular matrix (ECM), including to quantify the tissue fatigue response contributing to the safety limits of accumulated vibration exposure in the vocal fold ECM, and to quantify the viscoelastic shear properties of human vocal fold scar tissues;(2) To characterize the active contractile properties and passive viscoelastic properties of human intrinsic laryngeal muscles;(3) To develop new constitutive models of the vocal fold lamina propria and the intrinsic laryngeal muscles for more accurate descriptions of their tissue mechanics;and (4) To develop new biomechanical models for fundamental frequency regulation and prediction;as well as to integrate the new empirical data and new constitutive models with existing computational biomechanical models of vocal fold posturing and phonation. A major benefit of this research will be an improvement in the computer models of vocal fold posturing and phonation, such that they will become more accurate, more consistent and more representative of human voice production. Such models can potentially become a powerful clinical tool for maximizing the vocal function of patients undergoing phonosurgical procedures, such as thyroplasty, injection laryngoplasty and minithyrotomy for the treatment of a variety of voice disorders.

Public Health Relevance

Up to 9% of Americans suffer from some kind of voice disorders annually. The economic impact of voice disorders cannot be overstated, as up to around 20% of the U.S. workforce relies on a healthy, functional voice as a major tool for their occupations (Titze et al., 1997). It has also been well documented that voice disorders have a significant negative impact on the quality of life in the areas of communication, social function and psychological health. By improving our understanding of the tissue mechanics of voice production, the potential mechanical factors responsible for voice disorders related to vocal overuse and trauma, and the mechanical manifestations of vocal fold scarring, this research may contribute findings that could improve the prevention, diagnosis and management of voice disorders, reducing the burden of excessive healthcare costs on society.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01DC006101-11
Application #
8284428
Study Section
Motor Function, Speech and Rehabilitation Study Section (MFSR)
Program Officer
Shekim, Lana O
Project Start
2003-04-01
Project End
2013-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
11
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$403,592
Indirect Cost
$87,703
Name
University of Texas Sw Medical Center Dallas
Department
Otolaryngology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
800771545
City
Dallas
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
75390
Kelleher, Jordan E; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W (2014) Collagen microstructure in the vocal ligament: initial results on the potential effects of smoking. Laryngoscope 124:E361-7
Hunter, Eric J; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W (2014) Strain modulations as a mechanism to reduce stress relaxation in laryngeal tissues. PLoS One 9:e90762
Smith, Simeon L; Hunter, Eric J (2014) A viscoelastic laryngeal muscle model with active components. J Acoust Soc Am 135:2041-51
Kelleher, Jordan E; Siegmund, Thomas; Du, Mindy et al. (2013) The anisotropic hyperelastic biomechanical response of the vocal ligament and implications for frequency regulation: a case study. J Acoust Soc Am 133:1625-36
Kelleher, Jordan E; Siegmund, Thomas; Du, Mindy et al. (2013) Empirical measurements of biomechanical anisotropy of the human vocal fold lamina propria. Biomech Model Mechanobiol 12:555-67
Dailey, Seth H; Gunderson, McLean; Chan, Roger et al. (2011) Local vascularized flaps for augmentation of Reinke's space. Laryngoscope 121 Suppl 3:S37-60
Mau, Ted; Brewer, Jacquelyn M; Gatzert, Samuel T et al. (2011) Three-dimensional conformation of the injected bolus in vocal fold injections in a cadaver model. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 144:552-7
Kelleher, Jordan E; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W et al. (2011) Optical measurements of vocal fold tensile properties: implications for phonatory mechanics. J Biomech 44:1729-34
Schachar, Ronald A; Chan, Roger W; Fu, Min (2011) Viscoelastic properties of fresh human lenses under 40 years of age: implications for the aetiology of presbyopia. Br J Ophthalmol 95:1010-3
Svensson, Bengt; Nagubothu, Srinivasa R; Cedervall, Jessica et al. (2011) Injection of human mesenchymal stem cells improves healing of vocal folds after scar excision--a xenograft analysis. Laryngoscope 121:2185-90

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