An ultimate goal of speech research is to develop a common theoretical framework that will link together vocal fold dynamics, aerodynamics, acoustics, and speech perception. Such a unified approach is essential in explaining how tissue movement finally results in the perception of speech sounds. Because of its role both as a coupled oscillator with the vocal folds and as the acoustic source, the glottal airflow provides information about both vocal fold vibration and the resulting acoustic signal that listeners ultimately perceive as voice quality. While the field of aeroacoustics and the theory of vortex sound are relatively advanced, the application of such theories to voice production is still in its infancy. Accordingly, exploitation of such theories in a comprehensive, systematic study of phonation over a broad range of phonatory conditions holds considerable promise for furthering our understanding of voice source mechanisms. Over a five-year period, we propose to address the following Specific Aims using analytic/computational models of phonation and three laboratory models of phonation (a driven physical model, a self-oscillating physical model, and human excised larynges): (1) quantify the near field glottal airflow over the breathy to pressed voice continuum, as manipulated by glottal adduction, (2) quantify the near field glottal airflow as a function of voice type (chest, falsetto, vocal fry), as induced by changes in the body/cover parameters of the vocal folds, (3) quantify the near field glottal airflow as a function of source/tract interactions, (4) quantify the near field glottal airflow as a function of left-right asymmetries of the vocal folds. For each of these Specific Aims, we will measure the near field glottal airflow, identify the voice source mechanisms contained therein, quantify the relative contribution of these voice source terms to the radiated acoustic output, and perform a spatio-temporal decomposition of the near field glottal airflow to extract the primary orthogonal models of the airflow and reveal the interaction of these modes in this critical sound-producing region.

Public Health Relevance

Successful completion of the proposed research will not only improve our understanding of voice source mechanisms across a variety of normal and disordered voice types, but also reveal relationships and interactions between various elements of the speech chain including vocal fold dynamics, aerodynamics, acoustics, and perception. In the future, this knowledge eventually may be conceptualized in the development of accurate, efficient, reduced-order models of phonation which may assist in practical clinical applications.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01DC009229-05
Application #
8197036
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-BBBP-T (92))
Program Officer
Shekim, Lana O
Project Start
2007-12-01
Project End
2013-06-30
Budget Start
2011-12-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$366,171
Indirect Cost
$100,078
Name
University of California Los Angeles
Department
Surgery
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
092530369
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90095
Yin, Jun; Zhang, Zhaoyan (2014) Interaction between the thyroarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles in the control of vocal fold adduction and eigenfrequencies. J Biomech Eng 136:
Xuan, Yue; Zhang, Zhaoyan (2014) Influence of embedded fibers and an epithelium layer on the glottal closure pattern in a physical vocal fold model. J Speech Lang Hear Res 57:416-25
Mendelsohn, Abie H; Xuan, Yue; Zhang, Zhaoyan (2014) Voice outcomes following laser cordectomy for early glottic cancer: a physical model investigation. Laryngoscope 124:1882-6
Zhang, Zhaoyan (2014) The influence of material anisotropy on vibration at onset in a three-dimensional vocal fold model. J Acoust Soc Am 135:1480-90
Zhang, Zhaoyan; Kreiman, Jody; Gerratt, Bruce R et al. (2013) Acoustic and perceptual effects of changes in body layer stiffness in symmetric and asymmetric vocal fold models. J Acoust Soc Am 133:453-62
Howe, M S; McGowan, R S (2013) AERODYNAMIC SOUND OF A BODY IN ARBITRARY, DEFORMABLE MOTION, WITH APPLICATION TO PHONATION. J Sound Vib 332:3909-3923
Berke, Gerald; Mendelsohn, Abie H; Howard, Nelson Scott et al. (2013) Neuromuscular induced phonation in a human ex vivo perfused larynx preparation. J Acoust Soc Am 133:EL114-7
Howe, M S; McGowan, R S (2013) Voicing produced by a constant velocity lung source. J Acoust Soc Am 133:2340-9
Howe, M S; McGowan, R S (2012) On the role of glottis-interior sources in the production of voiced sound. J Acoust Soc Am 131:1391-400
Chhetri, Dinesh K; Neubauer, Juergen; Berry, David A (2012) Neuromuscular control of fundamental frequency and glottal posture at phonation onset. J Acoust Soc Am 131:1401-12

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