The primary goal of this Bioengineering Research Partnership (BRP) is to demonstrate upper limb prosthesis control using our implantable myoelectric sensor (IMES) system in human amputees. By the end of this five year project period we plan to achieve our long term vision of demonstrating individual finger control of a prosthetic hand. The major factor limiting the development of sophisticated hand/arm prostheses remains the difficulty in locating and isolating sufficient numbers of command sources with which to control the many degrees-of-freedom required for a physiologically natural prosthetic hand and/or arm. While surface myoelectric (SEMG) sensing has been used for control of clinically-deployed myoelectric upper-limb prostheses, the use of multiple surface EMG signals as command sources is inherently limited by the gross nature, and lack of stability, of surface EMG signals. We believe that we can create many more EMG control sites by using IMES rather than SEMG electrodes. The primary goals of our previous BRP were to develop a myoelectric control system based upon implantable myoelectric sensors (IMES) and to demonstrate chronic functioning of this system in an animal model. These goals were accomplished. To achieve our new goal of implantation of IMES in humans and demonstration of enhanced prosthesis control, further technical development of our IMES system and human trials will be required.
The specific aims for this BRP proposal are: 1) Optimization of the IMES System to Interface with Clinically Deployable Prostheses: Revise the IMES implant, IMES-TC, and multi-degree-of-freedom prosthesis controller, develop clinician tools to design coils for patients. 2) Qualification Testing of IMES Hardware and FDA Approval: Qualification of IMES Implants, External IMES Hardware, and MDOF Controller;Preparation And Submission Of FDA IDE Application For Use Of IMES In A Human Clinical Trial. 3) Implantation And Testing of The IMES System in Humans: Phase 1 - Demonstration of the IMES System as a Substitute For SEMG Control Of Standard-Of-Care Transradial Myoelectric Hand Prostheses In Transradial Amputees;Phase 2 - Demonstration of the IMES System and MDOF Controller Coordinating Volitional Movements of The Individual Fingers And Thumb of A Prosthetic Hand In Transradial Amputees.

Public Health Relevance

primary goal of this Bioengineering Research Partnership (BRP) is to demonstrate upper limb prosthesis control using our implantable myoelectric sensor (IMES) system in human amputees. By the end of this five year project period we plan to achieve our long term vision of demonstrating individual finger control of a prosthetic hand. The major factor limiting the development of sophisticated hand/arm prostheses remains the difficulty in locating and isolating sufficient numbers of command sources with which to control the many degrees-of-freedom required for a physiologically natural prosthetic hand and/or arm. While surface myoelectric (SEMG) sensing has been used for control of clinically-deployed myoelectric upper-limb prostheses, the use of multiple surface EMG signals as command sources is inherently limited by the gross nature, and lack of stability, of surface EMG signals. We believe that we can create many more EMG control sites by using IMES rather than SEMG electrodes.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01EB001672-10
Application #
8730473
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel ()
Program Officer
Peng, Grace
Project Start
2003-09-30
Project End
2016-08-31
Budget Start
2014-09-01
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$1,225,286
Indirect Cost
$51,317
Name
University of Colorado Denver
Department
Pediatrics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
041096314
City
Aurora
State
CO
Country
United States
Zip Code
80045
Pasquina, Paul F; Evangelista, Melissa; Carvalho, A J et al. (2015) First-in-man demonstration of a fully implanted myoelectric sensors system to control an advanced electromechanical prosthetic hand. J Neurosci Methods 244:85-93
Troyk, Philip; Hu, Zhe (2013) Simplified design equations for Class-E neural prosthesis transmitters. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 60:1414-21
Birdwell, J Alexander; Hargrove, Levi J; Kuiken, Todd A et al. (2013) Activation of individual extrinsic thumb muscles and compartments of extrinsic finger muscles. J Neurophysiol 110:1385-92
Farrell, Todd R (2011) Determining delay created by multifunctional prosthesis controllers. J Rehabil Res Dev 48:xxi-xxxviii
Weir, Richard F ff; Troyk, Phil R; DeMichele, Glen A et al. (2009) Implantable myoelectric sensors (IMESs) for intramuscular electromyogram recording. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 56:159-71
Ajiboye, A B; Weir, R F (2009) Muscle synergies as a predictive framework for the EMG patterns of new hand postures. J Neural Eng 6:036004
Sensinger, Jonathon W; Weir, Richard F ff (2008) Modeling and preliminary testing socket-residual limb interface stiffness of above-elbow prostheses. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 16:184-90
Farrell, Todd R; Weir, Richard F Ff (2008) A comparison of the effects of electrode implantation and targeting on pattern classification accuracy for prosthesis control. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 55:2198-211
Sensinger, Jonathan W; ff Weir, Richard F (2008) User-modulated impedance control of a prosthetic elbow in unconstrained, perturbed motion. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 55:1043-55
Farrell, Todd R; Weir, Richard F (2007) The optimal controller delay for myoelectric prostheses. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 15:111-8

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