68% of US adults are either overweight or obese, and more than 100 million Americans have diabetes or pre- diabetes. These conditions may lead to cardiovascular disease and cancer. Recent research indicates a potential role for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are persistent organic pollutants in obesity and diabetes. PCBs were previously used in electrical transformers. Although they were banned over 30 years ago, PCBs are still present in the US food supply and in all adult Americans. Preliminary research performed by our group and others suggests that PCBs cause a "leaky gut" to disrupt the gut:liver:adipose axis. Subsequently, intestinal-derived bacterial products enter the bloodstream causing inflammation, liver disease and contribute to obesity and diabetes. We call this problem "toxic-metabolic endotoxemia". We hypothesize that PCBs interact with high fat or high carbohydrate diets through toxic metabolic endotoxemia to worsen obesity and diabetes;and studying this hypothesis is the overall objective of this grant.
The specific aims of this novel nutrient:toxin interaction translational project are to:!! 1) Determine in mice, mechanisms by which PCBs disrupt the gut:liver:adipose axis to increase metabolic endotoxemia and worsen diet-induced obesity/insulin resistance. 2) Determine the potential role of cellular receptors in PCBs-associated toxic-metabolic endotoxemia in mice and cell culture models. 3) Study mechanisms of toxic metabolic endotoxemia in stored blood samples from a large group of highly PCB-exposed humans. We expect to find that PCBs activate receptors, perturb the gut:liver:adipose axis, and worsen obesity/diabetes via toxic metabolic endotoxemia in mice and in humans. This innovative project is the first to study PCB- related endotoxemia in obesity/diabetes and is expected to lead to a new understanding of these conditions. The proposal is relevant to all overweight/obese people exposed to environmental pollution.

Public Health Relevance

We expect to find that PCBs worsen obesity/diabetes via toxic metabolic endotoxemia in mice and in humans. This innovative project is the first to study PCB-related endotoxemia in obesity/diabetes and is expected to lead to a new understanding of these conditions. The proposal is relevant to all overweight/obese people exposed to environmental pollution.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01ES021375-03
Application #
8618902
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-EMNR-D (55))
Program Officer
Heindel, Jerrold
Project Start
2012-05-08
Project End
2017-02-28
Budget Start
2014-03-01
Budget End
2015-02-28
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$334,125
Indirect Cost
$111,375
Name
University of Louisville
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
057588857
City
Louisville
State
KY
Country
United States
Zip Code
40292
Al-Eryani, Laila; Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K C et al. (2015) Identification of Environmental Chemicals Associated with the Development of Toxicant-associated Fatty Liver Disease in Rodents. Toxicol Pathol 43:482-97
Wahlang, Banrida; Song, Ming; Beier, Juliane I et al. (2014) Evaluation of Aroclor 1260 exposure in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 279:380-90
Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K Cameron; Clair, Heather B et al. (2014) Human receptor activation by aroclor 1260, a polychlorinated biphenyl mixture. Toxicol Sci 140:283-97
Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K Cameron; Gregory, Bonnie et al. (2013) Polychlorinated biphenyl 153 is a diet-dependent obesogen that worsens nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in male C57BL6/J mice. J Nutr Biochem 24:1587-95
Wahlang, Banrida; Beier, Juliane I; Clair, Heather B et al. (2013) Toxicant-associated steatohepatitis. Toxicol Pathol 41:343-60