The human eye is made from many diverse cell types in various tissue layers and structures. In diseased or damaged eyes the ability to replace defective or absent cell types has major therapeutic importance. Here retinal precursor cells need to be guided through various developmental steps in order to generate the required cell types. This grant aims to understand the processes of cell specification in a model retina;the developing Drosophila eye. The study is focused on the Notch and RTK signaling pathways. A series of complex interactions between these two pathways specify a number of distinct cell types, and we aim to use a variety of molecular, genetic and histological techniques to understand how the two signaling pathways are integrated and interpreted in the cells, and how this information then directs the specification of discrete retinal cell types.

Public Health Relevance

In therapies to restore vision, an understanding is required of how to differentiate the cells needed to repopulate damaged or deficient regions of the eye. The Drosophila eye provides an excellent model system with which to define the molecular codes that direct the formation of the various retinal cell types. Once defined in this model system, ths understanding can then be used to direct the generation of human retinal cell types required for therapeutic intervention.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Eye Institute (NEI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01EY023635-02
Application #
8719122
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (BVS)
Program Officer
Neuhold, Lisa
Project Start
2013-09-01
Project End
2017-08-31
Budget Start
2014-09-01
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$392,000
Indirect Cost
$147,000
Name
Columbia University (N.Y.)
Department
Genetics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
621889815
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10032