This four-year renewal of a successful prior grant seeks to integrate and expand the insights gained from the parent project (Assessing Scientific Inquiry and Leadership Skills). In the parent project, seven studies employing mixed (quantitative and qualitative) methods, retrospective and longitudinal designs with high school, undergraduate, and graduate students strongly supported a conceptual model that focused on the psychological constructs of science inquiry self-efficacy (i.e., a student's belief about his/her ability to perform successfully in scientific research) and identity as a scientist (i.e., a student's perception that there is a fit between his/her personal values and self concept and the social group of scientists). Commitment to a career in science and scientific performance at all levels of students were strongly influenced by self-efficacy and identity. And as predicted, the effects of science support program activities, particularly engagement in authentic research with good mentoring and the opportunity to associate with professional scientists and science students (community involvement) were fully mediated by efficacy and identity, i.e., the relationship of program activities to commitment and performance resulted indirectly from their effects on efficacy and identity. For the current project we propose to delve more deeply into the ways in which research, mentoring, and community involvement affect efficacy and identity to understand better the specific features of research settings and mentor behavior that are most effective. In partnership with the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS), five studies will examine the experiences of being mentored while doing authentic research, presenting that research at a scientific conference, and networking with research scientists and other science students. Students who attend the SACNAS annual conference will become part of a multi-year longitudinal survey study that tracks the students'psychological reactions (i.e., efficacy and identity) and relevant outcomes (e.g., continuation in science education, quality of scientific performance) several times per year over a two-year period. Quantitative surveys and follow-up interviews will provide access to students (and their mentors) as the students'attitudes and aptitudes change and develop over time, and reveal how important turning points are affected by mentor approaches and behaviors. Multiple measurements over time can provide information on how psychological constructs at various times (e.g., before and immediately after a poster presentation at the SACNAS conference;after success or failure in the classroom or laboratory, etc.) affect attitudes and behaviors in the future (e.g., maintaining an involvement in scientific research or applying and entering graduate school in science). Public Health Relevance Statement: The overall goal of this project is to strengthen programs that promote entry into and success in biomedical research careers, particularly by underrepresented minority students. Results will help to address the national shortage of scientists and engineers devoted to biomedical research. Increasing the diversity of individuals devoted to biomedical research will expand the research questions being addressed, the approaches used to conduct the research, and the implementation of research findings in policy and practice.

Public Health Relevance

The overall goal of this project is to strengthen programs that promote entry into and success in biomedical research careers, particularly by underrepresented minority students. Results will help to address the national shortage of scientists and engineers devoted to biomedical research. Increasing the diversity of individuals devoted to biomedical research will expand the research questions being addressed, the approaches used to conduct the research, and the implementation of research findings in policy and practice.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01GM071935-08
Application #
8278505
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZGM1-MORE-4 (RI))
Program Officer
Poodry, Clifton A
Project Start
2004-09-01
Project End
2014-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$322,953
Indirect Cost
$77,928
Name
University of California Santa Cruz
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
125084723
City
Santa Cruz
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
95064
Syed, Moin; Goza, Barbara K; Chemers, Martin M et al. (2012) Individual differences in preferences for matched-ethnic mentors among high-achieving ethnically diverse adolescents in STEM. Child Dev 83:896-910
Moran, Carrol; Cooper, Catherine R; Lopez, Angelica et al. (2009) Developing Effective P-20 Partnerships to Benefit Chicano/Latino Students and Families. J Hispanic High Educ 8:340-356