We will take a genetic approach to dissect the neuronal circuitry that underlies behavioral aversion of UV, using the Drosophila egg-laying site as our model system.
We aim to identify and characterize both the critical sensory neurons and their post-synaptic targets that govern UV aversion. In addition, we will also assess the roles of neuro-modulatory neurons in adjusting the strength of UV aversion via modulating the communication between the specific sensory and central neurons we identified.

Public Health Relevance

The ability to detect, assess, and respond properly to aversive stimuli is essential for animal survival and reproductive success;failure to sense significant threats causes bodily harm while unchecked sensitivity to mild aversive stimuli may incur opportunity loss as well as stress-induced mental illness. Given that the channel, neuropeptide, and neuro-modulatory systems we are investigating in our proposal all appear to be conserved across species, our findings will likely shed light on how stress is processed in humans.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01GM100027-02
Application #
8549268
Study Section
Neurodifferentiation, Plasticity, and Regeneration Study Section (NDPR)
Program Officer
Sesma, Michael A
Project Start
2012-09-24
Project End
2017-07-31
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$284,010
Indirect Cost
$100,660
Name
Duke University
Department
Biology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
044387793
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27705
Gou, Bin; Liu, Ying; Guntur, Ananya R et al. (2014) Mechanosensitive neurons on the internal reproductive tract contribute to egg-laying-induced acetic acid attraction in Drosophila. Cell Rep 9:522-30
Liu, Ying; Yang, Chung-hui (2014) Unveiling the secrets to her heart. Neuron 83:3-5
Zhu, Edward Y; Guntur, Ananya R; He, Ruo et al. (2014) Egg-laying demand induces aversion of UV light in Drosophila females. Curr Biol 24:2797-804