Major transformations in family behavior (marriage, cohabitation, divorce, childbearing and the use of child care centers) have occurred in the United States and other developed countries. These family behavior changes occurred in a context of major structural changes in the economy, education and other institutions, along with changes in the attitudes of individuals towards many components of what had been the traditional family institution. The implications of these changes have been profound, for both the family system (e.g. children growing up in single parent families) and other institutions (e.g. the link between low fertility and old- age support systems). The changes in family behavior have been well documented, but the processes that led to such dramatic changes are still not well understood. Building upon an existing cross-sectional data set, the proposed research will collect and build a data set that is specifically designed to address the interplay of structural societal change, individual behavior and attitudes, and the emergence of an altered family institution in a country, Japan, where many of these family behavior changes began recently, thus affording a chance to examine the processes that facilitate broad-scale family behavior change. After a series of theoretically informed descriptive analyses, we conduct a series of statistical analyses, using first difference and instrumental variables models, examining changes in attitudes towards non-traditional family behaviors, as well as changes in marital happiness and fertility intentions. Based on prior work suggesting that cohabitation is the linchpin in family change in Japan, using a reduced form random effects hazard model, we examine the age pattern of cohabitation and differentials in the probability of cohabiting.

Public Health Relevance

Major transformations in family behavior (marriage, cohabitation, divorce, childbearing and the use of child care centers) have occurred. The implications of these changes are profound, for both children (e.g. children growing up in single parent families) and the elderly (e.g. the changing ratio of workers and retirees). This project examines the processes, macro and micro, whereby such family behavior changes occur.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HD042474-08
Application #
8302355
Study Section
Social Sciences and Population Studies Study Section (SSPS)
Program Officer
King, Rosalind B
Project Start
2002-07-01
Project End
2014-07-31
Budget Start
2012-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$232,615
Indirect Cost
$48,802
Name
East-West Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
077665396
City
Honolulu
State
HI
Country
United States
Zip Code
96848
Choe, Minja Kim; Bumpass, Larry L; Tsuya, Noriko O et al. (2014) Nontraditional Family-Related Attitudes in Japan: Macro and Micro Determinants. Popul Dev Rev 40:241-271