This competing continuation proposal examines a developmental model of adolescents'peer and family experiences as predictors of long-term psychosocial outcomes in adulthood. We propose to follow a diverse community sample of 172 adolescents, their parents, peers, and romantic partners from ages 13 to 27. We focus upon two stage-salient tasks of adolescence?establishing autonomy and maintaining and building social bonds?and hypothesize that the resolution of these tasks will be fundamental to understanding qualities of adult psychosocial functioning. We also assess important cognitive, affective, and contextual factors that may mediate continuities and discontinuities from adolescent to adult relationship quality and that may potentially serve as targets for intervention efforts. We organize our efforts into three primary Aims:
Aim 1 : Parent and Peer Predictors of Adult Relationship Quality: We begin by seeking to identify critical continuities in adolescent relationship qualities that persist into early adulthood. We focus upon predictors of aspects of adult relationships?particularly social isolation and hostility?known to be closely linked to both mental and physical health.
Aim 2 : Mediators &Moderators of Continuities and Discontinuities from Adolescence to Adulthood: We next examine several processes that potentially mediate the continuities or account for the discontinuities identified in Aim 1. We focus on three specific factors: the individual's attachment organization, rejection sensitivity, and major developmental/contextual transitions.
Aim 3 : Early Adult Adaptational Outcomes: Direct &Mediated Pathways from Adolescence: Finally, we consider adolescent-era predictors of internalizing and externalizing symptoms in adulthood and of the development of functional autonomy?the capacity to manage one's own career, financial, and residential needs. We assess both direct predictions from adolescent relationship qualities across this fifteen-year span, as well as predictions mediated via adult relationship qualities (Aim 1) and intervening factors (Aim 2). This study builds on the vast body of research that has examined relational predictors of functioning within adolescence but now seeks to extend and ground this research by determining which of the many qualities of social relationships that have been identified as important within adolescence are actually predictive of long-term, life outcomes in adulthood. As such, it seeks to inform: a) parents, educators, and clinicians working with adolescents and early adults;b) interventions targeting parenting behaviors and/or peer influences (e.g., delinquency, aggression, and substance abuse prevention and treatment programs);and c) developing theories of the links between social relationships and functional outcomes across this critical portion of the lifespan. Project Narrative This study seeks to identify essential qualities of adolescents'relationships with peers and parents that predict long-term success or failure in adult psychological functioning. It is designed to provide knowledge that will ultimately reduce the incidence of both externalizing symptoms (e.g., delinquency, aggression, substance abuse) and internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety, social isolation) in late adolescence and early adulthood by informing: a) parents, educators, and clinicians working with adolescents and early adults;b) interventions targeting parenting behaviors and/or peer influences (e.g., delinquency, aggression, and substance abuse prevention and treatment programs);and c) developing theories of the links between social relationships and functional outcomes across this critical portion of the lifespan.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HD058305-15
Application #
8277305
Study Section
Psychosocial Development, Risk and Prevention Study Section (PDRP)
Program Officer
Esposito, Layla E
Project Start
2008-07-10
Project End
2013-05-31
Budget Start
2012-06-01
Budget End
2013-05-31
Support Year
15
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$546,392
Indirect Cost
$175,129
Name
University of Virginia
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
065391526
City
Charlottesville
State
VA
Country
United States
Zip Code
22904
Szwedo, David E; Chango, Joanna M; Allen, Joseph P (2015) Adolescent romance and depressive symptoms: the moderating effects of positive coping and perceived friendship competence. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 44:538-50
Oudekerk, Barbara A; Allen, Joseph P; Hessel, Elenda T et al. (2015) The cascading development of autonomy and relatedness from adolescence to adulthood. Child Dev 86:472-85
Allen, Joseph P; Chango, Joanna; Szwedo, David et al. (2014) Long-term sequelae of subclinical depressive symptoms in early adolescence. Dev Psychopathol 26:171-80
Oudekerk, Barbara A; Allen, Joseph P; Hafen, Christopher A et al. (2014) Maternal and Paternal Psychological Control as Moderators of the Link between Peer Attitudes and Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior. J Early Adolesc 34:413-435
Allen, Joseph P; Chango, Joanna; Szwedo, David (2014) The adolescent relational dialectic and the peer roots of adult social functioning. Child Dev 85:192-204
Hafen, Christopher A; Spilker, Ann; Chango, Joanna et al. (2014) To Accept or Reject? The Impact of Adolescent Rejection Sensitivity on Early Adult Romantic Relationships. J Res Adolesc 24:55-64
Allen, Joseph P; Schad, Megan M; Oudekerk, Barbara et al. (2014) What ever happened to the "cool" kids? Long-term sequelae of early adolescent pseudomature behavior. Child Dev 85:1866-80
Dawson, Anne E; Allen, Joseph P; Marston, Emily G et al. (2014) Adolescent insecure attachment as a predictor of maladaptive coping and externalizing behaviors in emerging adulthood. Attach Hum Dev 16:462-78
Hafen, Christopher A; Laursen, Brett; Nurmi, Jari-Eri et al. (2013) Bullies, victims, and antipathy: the feeling is mutual. J Abnorm Child Psychol 41:801-9
Hafen, Christopher A; Allen, Joseph P; Mikami, Amori Yee et al. (2012) The pivotal role of adolescent autonomy in secondary school classrooms. J Youth Adolesc 41:245-55

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