The Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families that began in 1968. With data collected on the same families and their descendents for 36 waves over 41 years (as of 2009), the PSID can justifiably be considered a cornerstone for empirical social science research in the U.S. Through its long-term measures of economic and social well-being, and based on its weighted representative sample of U.S. families, the study has compelled researchers to address the dynamics of social, economic, demographic, and health processes and their interrelationships. NICHD has co-sponsored the collection of the biennial PSID core interview in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011. This project will build upon this prior investment by collecting, in 2013 and 2015, core data on family dynamics and background and new data on education and on newborns supplemented by administrative linkages.
The specific aims are to administer three PSID modules: (1) a family dynamics and background module, comprising 8.5 minutes of survey questions on marriage, fertility, family composition, family background, childhood circumstances, and related topics;(2) an education module that will measure changes in educational attainment and educational experiences between waves for all persons 16 years of age and older and will be used for linking education enrollment reports to national databases on educational institutions;and (3) a newborn module that will collect detailed information for all births that occur between waves and will allow us to obtain linked birth records from state vital statistics databases that provide gold- standard information on birth outcomes. After collection, the data will be processed and distributed in the PSID Online Data Center, which will allow users to create customized extracts and codebooks using a cross-year variable index. In addition, outreach and support will continue to be provided to current and new data users. The proposed modules will make PSID the only long-term panel representative of the full U.S. population that can be used to study family dynamics, investments in children, and well-being over the life course, across generations, and over time.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed project will expand the scientific value of the PSID data archive by providing new opportunities for the study of family dynamics, investments in children, and well-being over the life course, across generations, and over time. The expansion of information on educational attainment will pave the way for new scientific discoveries by supporting more detailed analyses of the determinants of schooling decisions within the family context as well as the effects of these decisions on demographic, social, and economic outcomes over the life course. The addition of data on newborns will open up opportunities for studying birth outcomes and provide a foundation for studying the consequence of birth outcomes and very- early life experiences for health, development, and well-being throughout childhood, adolescence, and the adult years.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HD069609-04
Application #
8669738
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1)
Program Officer
Bures, Regina M
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Department
Biostatistics & Other Math Sci
Type
Organized Research Units
DUNS #
City
Ann Arbor
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48109
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