We will develop methods and parallel flow instrumentation for high-throughput, high- content, cell-based screening, for phenotyping and manipulation of small rare-cell fractions, and for multiplexed expression analysis from 1-100 cells in flow. We will provide means for combinatorial scaling of mechanistic and small-molecule studies of protein misfolding disease, particularly neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's (model organism: yeast). And for high-content cytometry studies with (rare) primary hematopoietic stem cells (mouse).

Public Health Relevance

This program would develop new instrumentation and methods for cell-based high- throughput, high-content screening (HCS). The program addresses bottlenecks that severely limit HCS for (i) scale-up to drug discovery, (ii) for handling of small samples of highly heterogeneous primary cell types;(iii) for finding rare cells (e.g. finding pluripotent cells for cancer diagnostics) and, (iv) image-based sorting/enrichment.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HG001389-17
Application #
8290487
Study Section
Instrumentation and Systems Development Study Section (ISD)
Program Officer
Schloss, Jeffery
Project Start
1995-09-30
Project End
2014-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
17
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$702,204
Indirect Cost
$262,429
Name
Boston University
Department
Engineering (All Types)
Type
Schools of Engineering
DUNS #
049435266
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02215
McKenna, Brian K; Evans, James G; Cheung, Man Ching et al. (2011) A parallel microfluidic flow cytometer for high-content screening. Nat Methods 8:401-3
Ueberfeld, Joern; Ehrlich, Daniel J (2009) Scaling of nucleic acid assays on microelectrophoresis array devices: high-dynamic range multi-gene readout from less than ten transcripts. Electrophoresis 30:2090-9