The susceptibility of adults who have family members with type 2 diabetes (DM) to the disease is markedly increased in the setting of sedentary living and excessive weight gain. Lifestyle modification combining modest weight loss and increased physical activity can reduce the incidence of DM in high-risk populations. Today, a growing number of Americans report having short sleep hours and prospective epidemiological data reveal an independent association of reduced sleep duration with an increased incidence of diabetes and obesity. It has been proposed that increased rates of energy metabolism require increased amounts of sleep to correct the biochemical consequences of waking metabolic activity. So far, the possibility that short sleep hours may compromise physical activity and its metabolic benefits, and exacerbate the adverse effects of sedentary living has not been considered. Thus, the primary goal of this proposal is to test the hypothesis that short sleep duration is accompanied by reduced levels of everyday physical activity and aerobic fitness, and that recurrent sleep loss can disrupt the maintenance of adequate levels of exercise in adults with increased risk for DM. Experimental sleep deprivation can also interfere with the secretion and systemic action of insulin in the absence of changes in everyday physical activity. However, the effects of recurrent sleep loss on the secretion and metabolic actions of insulin in high-risk populations have not been investigated. Another important goal of this proposal is to determine the magnitude and define the potential mechanisms of the effects of sleep loss on glucose homeostasis in adults at risk for DM. To achieve these goals, we will combine studies of high-risk individuals with established long-term differences in usual sleep duration under free-living conditions with experiments, that involve controlled manipulations of the amount of sleep in the laboratory, in order to explore the impact of short sleep hours on daily activity-related energy expenditure, exercise habits, beta-cell function, and insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and fat. If short sleep is found to have an adverse impact on the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure, aerobic fitness, and insulin secretion or action in individuals at risk, these studies may help us to identify new non-pharmacological opportunities for the prevention of DM.

Public Health Relevance

If short sleep is found to have an adverse impact on the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure, aerobic fitness, and insulin secretion or action in individuals at risk, these studies may help us to identify new non-pharmacological opportunities for the prevention of DM.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HL089637-04
Application #
8088074
Study Section
Clinical and Integrative Diabetes and Obesity Study Section (CIDO)
Program Officer
Twery, Michael
Project Start
2008-07-01
Project End
2013-04-30
Budget Start
2011-05-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$455,518
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Chicago
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
005421136
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60637
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Kilkus, Jennifer M; Booth, John N; Bromley, Lindsay E et al. (2012) Sleep and eating behavior in adults at risk for type 2 diabetes. Obesity (Silver Spring) 20:112-7
Booth, John N; Bromley, Lindsay E; Darukhanavala, Amy P et al. (2012) Reduced physical activity in adults at risk for type 2 diabetes who curtail their sleep. Obesity (Silver Spring) 20:278-84
Penev, Plamen D (2011) Short sleep and circulating adipokine concentrations: does the fat hit the fire? Sleep 34:131-2
Darukhanavala, Amy; Booth 3rd, John N; Bromley, Lindsay et al. (2011) Changes in insulin secretion and action in adults with familial risk for type 2 diabetes who curtail their sleep. Diabetes Care 34:2259-64
Kessler, Lynn; Nedeltcheva, Arlet; Imperial, Jacqueline et al. (2010) Changes in serum TSH and free T4 during human sleep restriction. Sleep 33:1115-8
Nedeltcheva, Arlet V; Kilkus, Jennifer M; Imperial, Jacqueline et al. (2010) Insufficient sleep undermines dietary efforts to reduce adiposity. Ann Intern Med 153:435-41

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