Our parent grant involves a comprehensive examination of common and specific risk factors for emotional disorders, with a rich array of measures of personality traits, life stress, symptom status and diagnostic status, assessed repeatedly over a 4-year interval, as well as other measures assessed only once in the first year cognitive biases (attentional bias, interpretive bias, and memory bias) and psychophysiological functioning (daily cortisol rhythms and fear potentiated startle). Our sample is comprised of 627 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents recruited during their junior year in high school. Using a high risk design, we overselected (60%) Ps who scored high on a measure of neuroticism to increase our power to identify risk factors for emotional disorders and allow evaluation of various models of commonalities and specificities of risk and their interaction with stress? We now propose to extend data collection for another 4 years, by which time most of our sample will be aged 23 to 25 years. By so doing, we will extend the goals of the parent grant in several ways. First, we will be able to study risk factors for emotional disorders whose average age of onset peaks after the original window of 16 20 years. Second, we will be better able to evaluate risk factors for course, severity and comorbidity among the emotional disorders. Third, by repeating risk measurement, we will be able to evaluate stability/plasticity in risk and its relationship to the onset, course, and comorbidity of emotional disorders. In addition, we propose several new directions. First, we propose to evaluate the relationship between genetic markers (DRD4, 5HTT and markers of coping) and emotional disorders, especially the interaction between genetic markers and indices of episodic and chronic life stress, and the hypothesized role of personality traits in mediating the associations between the genetic markers and emotional disorders. Also, we propose to evaluate potential candidate genetic markers of coping styles that have been hypothesized to decrease risk for emotional disorders. Second, we propose to evaluate personality pathology and its moderation of psychopathology over the period of transition into adulthood. We will also test whether attainment of developmental milestones associated with young adulthood and whether changes in normal personality traits common in young adulthood are predicted by earlier personality trait levels and emotional disorders and are predictors of later emotional disorders. Furthermore, we propose additional risk variables of early adversity, perceived control, coping style and rumination.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01MH065652-10
Application #
8096743
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-BBBP-M (60))
Program Officer
Muehrer, Peter R
Project Start
2002-06-18
Project End
2013-07-31
Budget Start
2011-08-01
Budget End
2013-07-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$334,522
Indirect Cost
Name
Northwestern University at Chicago
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
160079455
City
Evanston
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60201
Conway, Christopher C; Zinbarg, Richard E; Mineka, Susan et al. (2017) Core dimensions of anxiety and depression change independently during adolescence. J Abnorm Psychol 126:160-172
Gilbert, Kirsten; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E et al. (2017) Emotion Regulation Regulates More than Emotion: Associations of Momentary Emotion Regulation with Diurnal Cortisol in Current and Past Depression and Anxiety. Clin Psychol Sci 5:37-51
Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Sewart, Amy; Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne et al. (2017) The Effects of Childhood and Adolescent Adversity on Substance Use Disorders and Poor Health in Early Adulthood. J Youth Adolesc 46:15-27
Conway, Christopher C; Craske, Michelle G; Zinbarg, Richard E et al. (2016) PATHOLOGICAL PERSONALITY TRAITS AND THE NATURALISTIC COURSE OF INTERNALIZING DISORDERS AMONG HIGH-RISK YOUNG ADULTS. Depress Anxiety 33:84-93
Tabak, Benjamin A; Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Zinbarg, Richard E et al. (2016) Interaction of CD38 Variant and Chronic Interpersonal Stress Prospectively Predicts Social Anxiety and Depression Symptoms Over Six Years. Clin Psychol Sci 4:17-27
Kendall, Ashley D; Zinbarg, Richard E; Bobova, Lyuba et al. (2016) Measuring Positive Emotion With the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties of the Anhedonic Depression Scale. Assessment 23:86-95
Kendall, Ashley D; Zinbarg, Richard E; Mineka, Susan et al. (2015) Prospective associations of low positive emotionality with first onsets of depressive and anxiety disorders: Results from a 10-wave latent trait-state modeling study. J Abnorm Psychol 124:933-43
Hoyt, Lindsay T; Craske, Michelle G; Mineka, Susan et al. (2015) Positive and negative affect and arousal: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with adolescent cortisol diurnal rhythms. Psychosom Med 77:392-401
Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Stroud, Catherine B; Mineka, Susan et al. (2015) Chronic and episodic interpersonal stress as statistically unique predictors of depression in two samples of emerging adults. J Abnorm Psychol 124:918-32
Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Stroud, Catherine B; Mineka, Susan et al. (2015) Additive genetic risk from five serotonin system polymorphisms interacts with interpersonal stress to predict depression. J Abnorm Psychol 124:776-90

Showing the most recent 10 out of 50 publications