Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most prevalent mental disorders, and is associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and economic costs. The Stony Brook Temperament Study is an ongoing longitudinal study that seeks to identify early behavioral precursors/risk factors for depression and understand the neurobiological and psychosocial processes through which these early manifestations develop into MDD. This information about risk pathways and processes should contribute to understanding when and how to intervene in order to prevent the disorder and limit its progression. The study initially assessed a large community sample of 3-year old children, followed them up at age 6, and is currently evaluating them in middle childhood (age 9). This competing renewal application seeks to extend the study into adolescence, the beginning of the peak risk period for onset of MDD. Specifically, the application proposes to map pathways from laboratory observations of low positive emotionality and high negative emotionality at age 3 to neural indices of emotional and social information processing, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation, and emerging depressive and anxiety symptoms in early- (age 12) and mid- (age 15) adolescence. In addition, it seeks to understand the role of pubertal development and life stress in influencing these trajectories, and to capture the early portion of the expected sure in first-onset MDD that begins at puberty and continues through early adulthood.

Public Health Relevance

The depressive disorders are highly prevalent and associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and economic costs. This project seeks to identify early behavioral precursors/risk factors for major depressive disorder and understand the neurobiological and psychosocial processes through which these early manifestations develop into clinically significant psychopathology. This will contribute to understanding when and how to intervene in order to prevent the disorder and/or its progression.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
2R01MH069942-10
Application #
8574224
Study Section
Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities Study Section (CPDD)
Program Officer
Garriock, Holly A
Project Start
2003-12-01
Project End
2019-04-30
Budget Start
2014-05-01
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
State University New York Stony Brook
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
City
Stony Brook
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
11794
Kopala-Sibley, Daniel C; Jelinek, Caitlin; Kessel, Ellen M et al. (2017) Parental depressive history, parenting styles, and child psychopathology over 6 years: The contribution of each parent's depressive history to the other's parenting styles. Dev Psychopathol 29:1469-1482
Ethridge, Paige; Kujawa, Autumn; Dirks, Melanie A et al. (2017) Neural responses to social and monetary reward in early adolescence and emerging adulthood. Psychophysiology 54:1786-1799
Barrios, Chelsey S; Bufferd, Sara J; Klein, Daniel N et al. (2017) The interaction between parenting and children's cortisol reactivity at age 3 predicts increases in children's internalizing and externalizing symptoms at age 6. Dev Psychopathol 29:1319-1331
Kessel, Ellen M; Kujawa, Autumn; Dougherty, Lea R et al. (2017) Neurophysiological Processing of Emotion in Children of Mothers with a History of Depression: the Moderating Role of Preschool Persistent Irritability. J Abnorm Child Psychol 45:1599-1608
Le, Thang M; Borghi, John A; Kujawa, Autumn J et al. (2017) Alterations in visual cortical activation and connectivity with prefrontal cortex during working memory updating in major depressive disorder. Neuroimage Clin 14:43-53
Schweizer, Tina H; Olino, Thomas M; Dyson, Margaret W et al. (2017) Developmental Origins of Rumination in Middle Childhood: The Roles of Early Temperament and Positive Parenting. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol :1-12
Meyer, Alexandria; Hajcak, Greg; Glenn, Catherine R et al. (2017) Error-related brain activity is related to aversive potentiation of the startle response in children, but only the ERN is associated with anxiety disorders. Emotion 17:487-496
Stumper, Allison; Danzig, Allison P; Dyson, Margaret W et al. (2017) Parents' behavioral inhibition moderates association of preschoolers' BI with risk for age 9 anxiety disorders. J Affect Disord 210:35-42
Meyer, Alexandria; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Danzig, Allison P et al. (2017) Neural Biomarker and Early Temperament Predict Increased Internalizing Symptoms After a Natural Disaster. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 56:410-416
Kujawa, Autumn; Carroll, Ashley; Mumper, Emma et al. (2017) A longitudinal examination of event-related potentials sensitive to monetary reward and loss feedback from late childhood to middle adolescence. Int J Psychophysiol :

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