Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most prevalent mental disorders, and is associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and economic costs. The Stony Brook Temperament Study is an ongoing longitudinal study that seeks to identify early behavioral precursors/risk factors for depression and understand the neurobiological and psychosocial processes through which these early manifestations develop into MDD. This information about risk pathways and processes should contribute to understanding when and how to intervene in order to prevent the disorder and limit its progression. The study initially assessed a large community sample of 3-year old children, followed them up at age 6, and is currently evaluating them in middle childhood (age 9). This competing renewal application seeks to extend the study into adolescence, the beginning of the peak risk period for onset of MDD. Specifically, the application proposes to map pathways from laboratory observations of low positive emotionality and high negative emotionality at age 3 to neural indices of emotional and social information processing, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation, and emerging depressive and anxiety symptoms in early- (age 12) and mid- (age 15) adolescence. In addition, it seeks to understand the role of pubertal development and life stress in influencing these trajectories, and to capture the early portion of the expected sure in first-onset MDD that begins at puberty and continues through early adulthood.

Public Health Relevance

The depressive disorders are highly prevalent and associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and economic costs. This project seeks to identify early behavioral precursors/risk factors for major depressive disorder and understand the neurobiological and psychosocial processes through which these early manifestations develop into clinically significant psychopathology. This will contribute to understanding when and how to intervene in order to prevent the disorder and/or its progression.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
2R01MH069942-10
Application #
8574224
Study Section
Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities Study Section (CPDD)
Program Officer
Garriock, Holly A
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
State University New York Stony Brook
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
City
Stony Brook
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
11794
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Kujawa, Autumn; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak; Klein, Daniel N (2014) Neural reactivity to rewards and losses in offspring of mothers and fathers with histories of depressive and anxiety disorders. J Abnorm Psychol 123:287-97
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Goldstein, Brandon L; Klein, Daniel N (2014) A review of selected candidate endophenotypes for depression. Clin Psychol Rev 34:417-27
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Torpey, Dana C; Hajcak, Greg; Kim, Jiyon et al. (2013) Error-related brain activity in young children: associations with parental anxiety and child temperamental negative emotionality. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 54:854-62
Dougherty, Lea R; Tolep, Marissa R; Bufferd, Sara J et al. (2013) Preschool anxiety disorders: comprehensive assessment of clinical, demographic, temperamental, familial, and life stress correlates. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 42:577-89

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