This project seeks support for the development of a novel mechanically responsive material system to study the relationship between local cell-level mechanical perturbation and cell response to chemical-physical biomaterial surface properties. The coating is based on a magnetoelastic material that can be remotely set to vibrate at a predetermined amplitude and profile. We hypothesize that local sub-cellular mechanical stimulus can be used to optimize substrate-cellular interactions to improve the long-term stability at the tissue-implant interface. Ultimately we hope to use these coatings as a real-time system for modulation and monitoring the surface of implantable biomaterials. Preliminary experiments have indicated that submicron localized vibrations, such as those generated by the proposed vibration coating, could potentially be coupled with tailored biomaterial surface properties to selectively control cellular adhesion and gene expression to promote and maintain proper integration at the implant-tissue interface. The specific goal of this proposal is to characterize the relationship between small local vibrations, substrate material surface character, and concomitant cellular response to applied vibrations.

Public Health Relevance

To date, there are no effective technologies for controlling the long-term deterioration of the biomaterial-tissue interface in implantable devices. Although this i an area of intense study with many novel approaches involving coatings and surface treatments, these approaches do not allow for in situ modulation of therapeutic effects. By developing the technology outlined in this proposal, it may be possible to monitor implant behavior as well as affect changes in the local mechanical and chemical environment. In addition, the results of this proposal will further impact the understanding of local vibrations asa therapeutic tool. Only recently has the mechanism of larger amplitude and frequency vibration (ultrasound) therapeutic effects on cell behavior become clearer. Our focal site-specific approach may lead to new strategies and applications for the use of these platform coatings in implantable biomaterials.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)
Type
Small Research Grants (R03)
Project #
5R03EB014504-02
Application #
8518099
Study Section
Instrumentation and Systems Development Study Section (ISD)
Program Officer
Hunziker, Rosemarie
Project Start
2012-08-01
Project End
2014-07-31
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$69,859
Indirect Cost
$22,709
Name
Michigan Technological University
Department
Engineering (All Types)
Type
Schools of Engineering
DUNS #
065453268
City
Houghton
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
49931