This study addresses how parents'discipline strategies affect children's development. The first and second aims are to examine whether the association between harsh discipline and child adjustment is moderated by: 1) the normativeness of the discipline method as indicated by cultural acceptance of its use, and 2) the affective quality of the parent-child relationship. We hypothesize that under conditions of cultural normativeness and warmth within the parent-child relationship, there is a weaker association between harsh discipline and children's adjustment difficulties.
The third aim i s to examine whether the association between harsh discipline and children's adjustment difficulties is mediated by children's cognitive appraisals regarding the discipline. The way children interpret a discipline practice is hypothesized to explain, in part, the link between discipline and children's adjustment. As part of understanding children's interpretations of discipline practices, we will try to """"""""unpack"""""""" culture into measurable contextual components and to understand specific characteristics of culture (e.g., beliefs, values) that affect parenting practices and children's interpretations of them. In the parent grant (R01HD054805-01A1), we will collect and analyze data in 8 countries (i.e., China, India, Italy, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, United States) and subgroups within these countries. In this FIRCA application, we propose the addition of data collection with two cultural groups in Jordan: native Jordanians living in Amman and Palestinian refugees living in refugee camps on the outskirts of Amman. Each cultural group has been selected because of its potential to provide a unique contribution to understanding how parents'discipline behaviors affect children's adjustment. Structured interviews will be conducted with 100 children and their mothers and fathers in each cultural group. Longitudinal follow-up will occur 12 months and 24 months after the initial assessment. Analyses will be conducted through structural equation modeling and multilevel modeling in which measurement occasions are nested within families, which are nested within cultures. Findings regarding mechanisms through which parenting affects children's adjustment will have public health implications because of their potential to influence interventions designed to prevent adjustment problems, especially in maltreated and other high-risk groups. Understanding how parents'discipline practices relate to children's adjustment from multiple cultural perspectives has the potential to inform applications of developmental psychology in law, policy, and intervention.

Public Health Relevance

Documenting parents'and children's appraisals of different forms of discipline and effects of these types of discipline on children's adjustment will facilitate more informed policy-making, particularly in relation to culture- specific definitions of child maltreatment. Furthermore, our findings regarding mechanisms through which parenting affects children's adjustment will influence interventions designed to prevent adjustment problems, especially in maltreated and other high-risk groups.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Fogarty International Center (FIC)
Type
Small Research Grants (R03)
Project #
5R03TW008141-03
Application #
7822905
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-BDA-K (50))
Program Officer
Liu, Xingzhu
Project Start
2008-09-25
Project End
2012-04-30
Budget Start
2010-05-01
Budget End
2012-04-30
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$26,917
Indirect Cost
Name
Duke University
Department
Type
Organized Research Units
DUNS #
044387793
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27705
Alampay, Liane Peña; Godwin, Jennifer; Lansford, Jennifer E et al. (2017) Severity and Justness Do Not Moderate the Relation Between Corporal Punishment and Negative Child Outcomes: A Multicultural and Longitudinal Study. Int J Behav Dev 41:491-502
Lansford, Jennifer E; Godwin, Jennifer; Al-Hassan, Suha M et al. (2017) Longitudinal Associations Between Parenting and Youth Adjustment in Twelve Cultural Groups: Cultural Normativeness of Parenting as a Moderator. Dev Psychol :
Bornstein, Marc H; Putnick, Diane L; Lansford, Jennifer E et al. (2017) 'Mixed blessings': parental religiousness, parenting, and child adjustment in global perspective. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 58:880-892
Lansford, Jennifer E; Godwin, Jennifer; Alampay, Liane Peña et al. (2016) Mothers', fathers' and children's perceptions of parents' expectations about children's family obligations in nine countries. Int J Psychol 51:366-74
Lansford, Jennifer E; Bornstein, Marc H; Deater-Deckard, Kirby et al. (2016) How International Research on Parenting Advances Understanding of Child Development. Child Dev Perspect 10:202-207
Lansford, Jennifer E; Godwin, Jennifer; Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria et al. (2015) Individual, family, and culture level contributions to child physical abuse and neglect: A longitudinal study in nine countries. Dev Psychopathol 27:1417-28
Dodge, Kenneth A; Malone, Patrick S; Lansford, Jennifer E et al. (2015) Hostile attributional bias and aggressive behavior in global context. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112:9310-5
Putnick, Diane L; Bornstein, Marc H; Lansford, Jennifer E et al. (2015) Perceived mother and father acceptance-rejection predict four unique aspects of child adjustment across nine countries. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 56:923-32
Bombi, Anna Silvia; Di Norcia, Anna; Di Giunta, Laura et al. (2015) Parenting Practices and Child Misbehavior: A Mixed Method Study of Italian Mothers and Children. Parent Sci Pract 15:207-228
Bornstein, Marc H; Putnick, Diane L; Lansford, Jennifer E et al. (2015) Mother and father socially desirable responding in nine countries: Two kinds of agreement and relations to parenting self-reports. Int J Psychol 50:174-85

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