Designed to address nationally recognized needs for increased numbers of psychiatric clinician-scholars and physician-scientists, this proposed competitive renewal of the conference grant, "Teaching Scholarly Activity in Psychiatric Training" (R13MH74298-5), seeks support for a series of full-day meetings of psychiatry residency training directors to increase their competence in evidence-based medicine, enhance their research literacy, and aid them in transporting that knowledge to their programs. Costs of conferences will be shared by the American Association of Psychiatric Residency Training Directors. The design of each year's meeting will be a series of morning plenary sessions covering new information pertaining to a contemporary clinical theme. The clinical theme will serve as a vehicle to teach evidence-based practice and research and neuroscience literacy. Lunchtime presentations will feature invited trainees describing their own processes of designing, implementing and disseminating research during their residencies, including successful strategies of finding time, mentorship and resources. The clinical theme will be carried into the afternoon with a series of highly interactive small group teaching sessions designed to consolidate knowledge and provide pragmatic teaching tools appropriate for residents. For the first year, the theme will be "Evidence-based Approaches to Suicide Risk Assessment and Prevention: Insights from the Neurosciences and Behavioral Sciences" and will feature plenary presentations by Drs. Maria Oquendo (assessment), John Mann (neurobiology) and Paula Clayton (prevention). Relevance of research findings to clinical practice will be stressed. Building on the plenary sessions, interactive small group sessions will focus on study design, publication skills, using technology to teach, and recruiting medical students into psychiatry. Themes for subsequent years, selected on the basis of balancing public health importance with new and emerging research discoveries, as well as opportunities to transmit the excitement and possibilities of transporting bench science to bedside practice, will be: clinical controversies and new treatment paradigms, the autism-spectrum, trauma through the life cycle and prevention. An important new component of this Conference proposal will be launching a research mentorship program to help enhance the research literacy of research naive training directors. Outcomes will include evaluations of each session and meeting, analyses of the impact of these Conferences on training programs, and the development of a registry of resident publications, research projects, grants, fellowships and academic positions. Conference proceedings and resources will be broadly disseminated by: publications;published proceedings;leveraging social networking sites;and posting presentations, handouts, digital audio and video recordings, and webinars on an accessible website.

Public Health Relevance

The application is designed to address nationally recognized needs for increased numbers of psychiatric clinician-scholars and physician-scientists. By helping psychiatry training directors become more enthusiastic, knowledgeable and pedagogically prepared to create research friendly environments at their home institutions, more trainees will, in turn, become research literate, practice evidence-based psychiatry and enter research fellowships and careers.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Conference (R13)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-CNF-M (02))
Program Officer
Hill, Lauren D
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University of California San Diego
Schools of Medicine
La Jolla
United States
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Zisook, Sidney; Boland, Robert; Cowley, Deborah et al. (2013) Teaching scholarly activity in psychiatric training: years 6 and 7. Acad Psychiatry 37:82-6