In patients, X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is caused by mutation in myotubularin (MTM1) and results in profound muscular weakness, respiratory failure and premature death. Most patients succumb to respiratory complications within 12 months of birth. Currently, there is no cure for this inherited disease, stemming, in par, from the lack of animal models that reflect both the genotype and phenotype of the human condition. Recently, a canine model of XLMTM was identified, and a genetic carrier of the disease was acquired. The establishment of the first XLMTM canine colony now allows investigators to develop and exploit a novel clinically-relevant animal model for pre-clinical trias. As a prerequisite to future preclinical trials, the onset, progression and pathophysiologic characteristics of the canine model will first require careful baseline studies. As such, the specific aims are:
Specific Aim 1. Establish the time course and define the characteristics of skeletal muscle histopathology in XLMTM dogs through analysis of serial biopsies.
Specific Aim 2. Establish the time course of progressive clinical decline in XLMTM dogs.

Public Health Relevance

X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is caused by mutation in myotubularin (MTM1) and results in profound muscular weakness, respiratory failure and premature death. Herein we propose to develop and exploit a novel canine model of XLMTM.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Type
Exploratory/Developmental Grants (R21)
Project #
1R21AR064503-01A1
Application #
8243315
Study Section
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review Group (NSD)
Program Officer
Nuckolls, Glen H
Project Start
2012-09-12
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-12
Budget End
2013-08-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$191,606
Indirect Cost
$62,357
Name
University of Washington
Department
Physical Medicine & Rehab
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
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