Diet clearly impacts inflammation;about one-third of the total energy intake in the US population comes from fast food consumption that is typically high in saturated fat, and recent demonstrations of enhanced inflammation following meals high in saturated fats have sparked interest in the possibility that postprandial inflammation acts as a driver for chronic inflammatory responses;when high-fat, fast-food-type meals flood the body with simple carbohydrates and triglycerides, the meals may also provoke spikes in IL-6 and CRP while enhancing oxidative stress and sympathetic hyperactivity. Furthermore, proinflammatory responses to high-fat meals are exaggerated by obesity, particularly visceral adiposity, and high-fat meals push obesity's characteristic elevated inflammation levels even higher and sustain them longer. Depression and psychosocial stress can also directly promote proinflammatory cytokine production, and a turbulent marriage is a rich source for both;marital discord greatly enhances risk for depression, and marital discord also has notable physiological repercussions as documented by its association with poorer clinical outcomes for inflammation-related conditions including cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. A series of well-controlled laboratory studies have provided important mechanistic data;negative or hostile behavior during marital conflict (a hallmark of marital discord) substantially augments adverse endocrine and immune changes, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Drawing on behavioral, nutritional, and immunological research, this double-blind, randomized crossover trial will assess changes in inflammation and mood following a fast-food-type meal compared to a healthier meal (moderate level of fats) in distressed and nondistressed couples. Couples will be asked to discuss and resolve a disagreement following both meals to maximize the salience and impact of marital distress on meal- related inflammatory responses;behavioral coding of these interactions will provide data on hostile marital behaviors. Our primary aim is to characterize the impact of a fast-food-type meal compared to a healthier meal on postprandial inflammatory responses in distressed and nondistressed couples, and to appraise the relative impact of central adiposity as a predictor of inflammatory responses. Our secondary, exploratory aim is to assess the relative contributions of gender and negative or hostile marital behaviors to depressive symptoms and inflammatory responses at baseline, as well as following the meal challenge. This proposal provides a new perspective on the biobehavioral pathways through which obesity, diet, and marital discord interact to promote inflammation. Elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with cancer risk, depression, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, Type II diabetes, and frailty and functional decline, underscoring the broad clinical relevance.

Public Health Relevance

This project seeks to lay the foundation for translational research that would enhance our understanding of the biobehavioral pathways through which obesity, diet, and marital discord interact to promote inflammation. The evidence that fast food-type meals promote postprandial dysmetabolism is relatively recent and still preliminary, but the possibility that postprandial inflammation acts as a driver for chronic inflammation is clearly important. Elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with cancer risk, depression, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, Type II diabetes, and frailty and functional decline, underscoring the broad clinical relevance.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Exploratory/Developmental Grants (R21)
Project #
5R21CA158868-02
Application #
8257918
Study Section
Behavioral Medicine, Interventions and Outcomes Study Section (BMIO)
Program Officer
Mc Donald, Paige A
Project Start
2011-04-14
Project End
2014-03-31
Budget Start
2012-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$199,013
Indirect Cost
$68,513
Name
Ohio State University
Department
Psychiatry
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
832127323
City
Columbus
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
43210
Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Jaremka, Lisa; Andridge, Rebecca et al. (2015) Marital discord, past depression, and metabolic responses to high-fat meals: Interpersonal pathways to obesity. Psychoneuroendocrinology 52:239-50
Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Jaremka, Lisa M; Hughes, Spenser (2014) Psychiatry and social nutritional neuroscience. World Psychiatry 13:151-2
Jaremka, Lisa M; Belury, Martha A; Andridge, Rebecca R et al. (2014) Interpersonal stressors predict ghrelin and leptin levels in women. Psychoneuroendocrinology 48:178-88
Jaremka, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Malarkey, William B et al. (2013) Marital distress prospectively predicts poorer cellular immune function. Psychoneuroendocrinology 38:2713-9
Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Jaremka, Lisa M; Derry, Heather M et al. (2013) Telomere length: a marker of disease susceptibility? Brain Behav Immun 34:29-30
Jaremka, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Loving, Timothy J et al. (2013) Attachment anxiety is linked to alterations in cortisol production and cellular immunity. Psychol Sci 24:272-9