Primary treatment for melanoma remains surgical excision with negative margins. Unfortunately, melanoma margins cannot be visualized or palpated;as a result surgeons obtain wide margins of healthy appearing tissue based on tumor histology and depth of penetration. Failure to improve surgical cures contributes to a failure to improve survival in this disease while most other cancer types have shown dramatically improved survival over the same time period. Improving melanoma survival depends on improving the primary treatment modality. We propose to determine if FDA approved antibodies to commonly expressed melanoma antigens can be leveraged for imaging of microscopic margins and regional disease. We propose to identify the optimal antibody (or combinations) for imaging, the sensitivity and specificity of this technique and the mechanisms by which it promotes fluorescence in the tumor. Using this strategy, histological margins can be selectively obtained and normal tissues spared. If successful such a technique would dramatically impact how surgical resections are performed.

Public Health Relevance

Although primary treatment for melanoma remains surgical excision with negative margins, tumor margins are very difficult to determine on inspection or on frozen section. We propose to determine if FDA approved antibodies to commonly expressed melanoma antigens can be leveraged for intraoperative imaging of primary tumors, microscopic margins and regional disease. If successful such a technique would dramatically change how oncological surgery is performed.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Exploratory/Developmental Grants (R21)
Project #
1R21CA179171-01
Application #
8564734
Study Section
Clinical Molecular Imaging and Probe Development (CMIP)
Program Officer
Zhang, Yantian
Project Start
2013-07-10
Project End
2015-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-10
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$191,672
Indirect Cost
$61,172
Name
University of Alabama Birmingham
Department
Surgery
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
063690705
City
Birmingham
State
AL
Country
United States
Zip Code
35294
Zinn, Kurt R; Korb, Melissa; Samuel, Sharon et al. (2015) IND-directed safety and biodistribution study of intravenously injected cetuximab-IRDye800 in cynomolgus macaques. Mol Imaging Biol 17:49-57
Warram, Jason M; de Boer, Esther; Sorace, Anna G et al. (2014) Antibody-based imaging strategies for cancer. Cancer Metastasis Rev 33:809-22