Retinal degeneration is a leading cause of blindness in the Western world and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common cause of hereditary visual loss in adult life. Although the genetic basis of RP has been well explored, the translation of this insight into successful genetic therapy has been hindered because of the mutational heterogeneity that underlies this group of diseases. In addition to gene therapy, we and others are exploring alternative therapeutic approaches employing recent advances in stem cell therapy, as well as the retinal prosthesis, bioengineering and pharmacology. Together these hold the promise for successful neural reconstitution in RP. Using the method of single cell nuclear transfer, we produced six male miniature swine (mini-swine) on a NIH cc haplotype carrying a mutant Pro23His (P23H) human rhodopsin transgene at the National Swine Resource Research Center at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Our preliminary data show that these founders exhibited an electrophysiologic phenotype characteristic of RP. Since P23H is the most common autosomal dominant mutation responsible for RP in man, we propose to establish a colony and characterize three independent transgenic lines of this new mini-swine model of photoreceptor degeneration. While outside the time frame of this application, in the near future it can be used by us and the vision community for novel therapeutic interventions.

Public Health Relevance

Using the method of single cell nuclear transfer, we produced six male miniature swine (mini-swine) on a NIH cc haplotype carrying a mutant Pro23His (P23H) human rhodopsin transgene at the National Swine Resource Research Center at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Our preliminary data show that these founders exhibited an electrophysiologic phenotype characteristic of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Since P23H is the most common autosomal dominant mutation responsible for RP in humans, we propose to establish a colony and characterize three independent transgenic lines of this new mini-swine model of photoreceptor degeneration for future therapeutic interventions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Eye Institute (NEI)
Type
Exploratory/Developmental Grants (R21)
Project #
5R21EY020647-02
Application #
8204540
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-CB-G (90))
Program Officer
Shen, Grace L
Project Start
2010-12-01
Project End
2013-11-30
Budget Start
2011-12-01
Budget End
2013-11-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$185,943
Indirect Cost
$32,977
Name
University of Louisville
Department
Ophthalmology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
057588857
City
Louisville
State
KY
Country
United States
Zip Code
40292
Scott, Patrick A; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Kaplan, Henry J et al. (2014) A Pro23His mutation alters prenatal rod photoreceptor morphology in a transgenic swine model of retinitis pigmentosa. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 55:2452-9
Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Scott, Patrick A; Fransen, James W et al. (2014) Cone photoreceptors develop normally in the absence of functional rod photoreceptors in a transgenic swine model of retinitis pigmentosa. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 55:2460-8
Noel, Jennifer M; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Demarco Jr, Paul J et al. (2012) Iodoacetic acid, but not sodium iodate, creates an inducible swine model of photoreceptor damage. Exp Eye Res 97:137-47
Ross, Jason W; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Zhao, Jianguo et al. (2012) Generation of an inbred miniature pig model of retinitis pigmentosa. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 53:501-7