Working memory is an essential cognitive faculty. Individual differences in working memory functioning can be quantified by working memory capacity (WMC). Higher WMC enables better performance in a diverse set of cognitive operations, including attention, reading comprehension, planning, and problem solving. There is evidence suggesting that higher WMC even confers the individual with the ability to better resist cognitive impairments in brain disorders. Despite its importance as a psychological construct, the neurophysiological underpinnings of WMC, however, remain not well understood. We will address this issue by pursuing Aim 1 in which we will investigate the individual differences in the task-related modulation of frontoparietal theta oscillations during working memory encoding and retention. Specifically, we will test the hypotheses that frontal theta power and frontoparietal theta coherence decrease with increasing working memory load during encoding and increase with increasing working memory load during retention and that theta modulation by working memory load during encoding and retention is positively correlated with working memory capacity. Research to date on the relation between neuronal oscillations and cognition tends to be correlative. Noninvasive neuromodulation provides a means to uncover the causal role of neuronal oscillations in cognition.
In Aim 2 we will test the efficacy of tACS stimulation at theta frequency in enhancing task-related theta modulation and working memory capacity. Specifically, we will test the hypotheses that in-phase theta tACS stimulation of the frontoparietal network upregulates task-related modulation of theta oscillations in working memory and enhances working memory capacity and that individuals with low working memory capacity will benefit more from in-phase theta tACS stimulation than individuals with high working memory capacity.

Public Health Relevance

Working memory is an essential cognitive faculty. Working memory capacity (WMC) quantifies individual differences in working memory functioning. Higher WMC enables better performance in a diverse set of cognitive operations, including attention, reading comprehension, planning, and problem solving, as well as confers improved resistance to cognitive impairments in brain disorders. In this project we (1) examine the relation between an individual's WMC and task-related modulation of theta oscillations in working memory and (2) test the efficacy of theta-frequency transcranial alternating current stimulation to upregulate task-related modulation of theta and thereby enhance WMC.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Exploratory/Developmental Grants (R21)
Project #
5R21MH112206-02
Application #
9625655
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1)
Program Officer
Buhring, Bettina D
Project Start
2018-01-15
Project End
2019-11-30
Budget Start
2018-12-01
Budget End
2019-11-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2019
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Florida
Department
Biomedical Engineering
Type
Biomed Engr/Col Engr/Engr Sta
DUNS #
969663814
City
Gainesville
State
FL
Country
United States
Zip Code
32611
Babu Henry Samuel, Immanuel; Wang, Chao; Hu, Zhenhong et al. (2018) The frequency of alpha oscillations: Task-dependent modulation and its functional significance. Neuroimage 183:897-906